Find Your Grail

The search for the Holy Grail takes a turn for the absurd and ludicrous when God charges King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table to find the cup of Christ in the raucous musical, Spamalot, currently playing at the Omaha Community Playhouse.

This story, based off of the movie, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, is actually a natural fit for a musical thanks to the unique, nonsense humor of Monty Python.  Since anything could, and often did, happen in Monty Python sketches, the thought of songs suddenly breaking out of nowhere seems like another day on the job for the Python crew.  The script is sharp and witty and a fairly good translation of the film due to the fact that it was written by Python alum, Eric Idle, who also composed the music with John Du Prez.

Even if you have seen the film, the musical promises lots of surprises with new scenes and characters not present in the original movie.  The flip side of this is that some of the classic moments of the film do not make it into the musical which may disappoint purists.  The new material is very good for the most part, but some of it is actually based off of old Python sketches causing those particular jokes to feel a bit forced since they were gags meant for something other than this play’s source material.

The directing of Mark Robinson and Jeff Horger is excellent.  This is a very high energy show and the pace never drags, slows, or pauses.  It is also very well staged and the two directors have shaped some strong, sharp performances from their group of actors.

Nick Albrecht blasts a home run in his Playhouse debut in the role of King Arthur.  Albrecht’s presence fills the theatre and his powerful baritone imbues Arthur with just the right blend of majesty, authority, and, dare I say, humility.  It is easy to see why people would want to follow this Arthur as Albrecht seems like a natural leader.  He also has a wry, subtle sense of humor best exemplified in numbers such as “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” and “Knights of the Round Table” with the latter being a particular highlight due to his “dancing”.  At the same time, Albrecht was also capable of fine dramatic moments with “Find Your Grail” and “I’m All Alone”.

Melanie Walters nearly swipes this show from the rest of the cast with her turn as the Lady of the Lake (as well as doing double duty as the show’s choreographer).  Beginning as an otherworldly fairy who granted the sword, Excalibur, to Arthur, Ms Walter slowly morphs into a diva as her acting gets a little bigger each and every time she appears on stage, culminating in her big moment “Whatever Happened to My Part?” which is actually a massive gripe about her lack of stage time.  And, heavens, can she sing!  Aside from her featured number, Ms Walters’ nearly superhuman alto also belted out several variations of “The Song That Goes Like This” (once in a dead on mimicry of Bette Midler) that was a treat for the ears.  Her performance alone is worth the price of admission and was one of the funniest performances of the season.

I would like to know where Matthias Jeske has been hiding because his is a phenomenal talent.  Jeske is a marvelously versatile performer as he leaps between multiple characters in his Playhouse debut.  So skillful and nuanced were Jeske’s changes in voice and body language that I found myself looking at my program several times and was stunned to discover that I was watching the same actor that I had only seen moments before.  Whether he was the erudite, if slightly pompous, Historian, the imposing Knight who said Ni, or the land hungry, music despising king of Swamp Castle, Jeske could do no wrong in a stunning, tour de force performance.  Jeske was equally impressive on the singing and dancing side of things with gut busting turns as Not Dead Fred in “I’m Not Dead Yet” and Sir Robin’s chief minstrel in “Brave Sir Robin”.

Other standouts in the cast were Zach Kloppenborg as the brutally violent, Sir Lancelot, who has his own secret (“His Name is Lancelot”) and the mercilessly funny French Taunter.  Brian Preisman’s coconut clapping and laconic Patsy.  Adam Hogston, whose cowardly Sir Robin joins the Knights because he wants to sing and dance and gets his chance in “You Won’t Succeed on Broadway”.  Don Harris as the intelligent Sir Bedevere (channeling a little Bill Murray) and the widowed, lonely mother of Dennis/Sir Galahad.  Ryan Pivonka as the acerbic Dennis who is transformed into the dashing Sir Galahad.  Marcus Benzel who dominates the stage in an awesome cameo performance as the effeminate Prince Herbert.

Jim Boggess and his orchestra strike gold again with a precisely performed and spritely score.  Steven Williams’ lighting and special effects add the right bit of atmosphere.  Steve Wheeldon’s scenery dazzles as we roam from old castles to “very expensive forests”.

A few minor flaws were present in the night’s performance.  There were sound issues on a few occasions and some of the dancers were slightly off at a couple of points.  The duel between King Arthur and the Black Knight also needed some tidying.  But these small quibbles are instantly forgotten in this hilarious and energetic romp.

Deep this show is not.  It’s all about fun and entertaining the audience.  Yet there is one deep thought prevalent in the show and that’s when Arthur refers to the quest for the Grail as a search for the Grail within ourselves or finding the one thing which makes us happy which all of the characters in this show are able to do.  I found that quite profound and a valuable life lesson.  So come see Spamalot for the moral lesson, but stay for the comedy.  Just watch out for that rabbit. . .

Spamalot plays at the Omaha Community Playhouse through June 28.  Showtimes are 7:30pm Wed-Sat and 2pm on Sundays.  Tickets cost $40 for adults and $25 for students.  Contact the box office at 402-553-0800 or visit www.omahaplayhouse.com The Omaha Playhouse is located at 6915 Cass St in Omaha, NE.

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Blue Barn Theatre Announces Season 27: INTIMATE. INTENSE. ADDICTIVE.

The BLUEBARN Theatre is excited to announce its 27th season. This will be the inaugural season in the BLUEBARN’s innovative convertible indoor/outdoor space at 10th & Pacific.

THE GROWN-UP By Jordan Harrison (September 17 – October 11, 2015)

Humana Festival Pick

Kai is a ten-year-old boy at his grandfather’s knee listening to a story of a magic doorknob. Jump 15 years and he is a young television writer weathering the humiliations of the Hollywood rat race. Jump in time again, and he and his future husband watch the caterer streak through their wedding reception. Has Kai run into powerful magic or has he just realized the breakneck speed of an ordinary life and what he might have missed? A funny and honest tale about living in the moment.

LITTLE NELLY’S NAUGHTY NOËL By Tim Siragusa; Songs by Jill Anderson (November 27-December 20, 2015)

Back by popular demand!! Little Nelly’s Naughty Noël is a Blue Barn perversion of all we hold dear, at that holliest, jolliest time of the year! With a mad gang of varmints both bawdy and bold, the play takes a wild, woolly romp through Nebraskee of old in an evening that can be described as “Willa Cather on crack” or “The Gift of the Magi”; laid out on a rack!

FROST/NIXON By Peter Morgan (February 4-28, 2016)

Richard M. Nixon has just resigned the United States presidency in total disgrace over Vietnam and the Watergate scandal. British talk-show host David Frost has become a lowbrow laughing-stock. Determined to resurrect his career, Frost risks everything on a series of in-depth interviews in order to extract an apology from Nixon. The cagey Nixon, however, is equally bent on redeeming himself in his nation’s eyes. In the television age, image is king, and both men are desperate to outtalk and upstage each other as the cameras roll. The result is the interview that sealed a president’s legacy.

THE CHRISTIANS By Lucas Hnath (March 24-April 17, 2016)

Humana Festival Pick

Twenty years ago, Pastor Paul’s church was nothing more than a modest storefront. Now he presides over a congregation of thousands, with classrooms for Sunday School, a coffee shop in the lobby, and a baptismal font as big as a swimming pool. Today should be a day of celebration. But Paul is about to preach a sermon that will shake the foundations of his church’s belief. A big-little play about faith in America—and the trouble with changing your mind.

HEATHERS – THE MUSICAL Music, Lyrics, and Book by Laurence O’Keefe and Kevin Murphy (May 19-June 19, 2016)

The darkly delicious story of Veronica Sawyer, the brainy and beautiful misfit who hustles her way into the most powerful and ruthless clique at Westerberg High: the Heathers. But before she can get comfortable atop the high school food chain, Veronica falls for the dangerously sexy new kid, J.D., who plans to put the Heathers in their place – six feet under.

OUT OF THE BLUE, a new Special Event series:

WALK THE NIGHT: The highly successful immersive theatre event returns in October to explore the world of one of an original Shakespearean ghost tale. Location and more information to be announced.  October 21 – November 14

PORCHYARD READINGS: 4 staged readings of contemporary plays that entice audiences to embrace risk and celebrate discovery. New works. New voices. New adventures.

* WELL by Lisa Kron – September 21

* STRAIGHT WHITE MEN by Young Jean Lee – December 7

* RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN by Gina Gionfriddo – February 15

* MR. BURNS: A POST-ELECTRIC PLAY by Anne Washburn – April 4

 About The BLUEBARN Theatre

The BLUEBARN Theatre has been bringing professionally-produced plays to area audiences since. Since its inception, BLUEBARN has produced over 100 plays and has established itself as Omaha’s professional contemporary theatre company.  Striving to bring artistically significant scripts and professional production values to Omaha and the surrounding region, BLUEBARN is known for high-quality entertainment and the fearless pursuit of stories that challenge both theatre artists and patrons.

The BLUEBARN Theatre’s season is generously supported by HOLLAND FOUNDATION * MAMMEL FOUNDATION *  SHUBERT FOUNDATION INC. * PETER KIEWIT FOUNDATION * NEBRASKA ARTS COUNCIL* NEBRASKA CULTURAL ENDOWMENT* DOUGLAS COUNTY

To provoke thought, emotion, action, and change through daring and innovative theatre…

Omaha Playhouse Announces 2015-16 Alternative Programming Schedule

The Omaha Playhouse announced their 2015-16 Alternative Programming schedule at a meet and greet with new Associate Artistic Director, Jeff Horger.  The season promises a little something for everybody with family fare, thought-provoking dramas, and even a musical or two.

Detroit 67

Staged Reading | Howard Drew Theatre
Written by Dominique Morisseau | Directed by Lara Marsh

Set during the explosive Detroit race riots of 1967, Detroit 67 is the story of two siblings trying to make ends meet. They turn their basement into an after-hours joint in an attempt to bring in some money. When a mysterious woman finds her way into their lives, the siblings clash over much more than the family business.

Contains mature content.

Take Me Out

Staged Reading | Howard Drew Theatre

Written by Richard Greenberg | Directed by Noah Diaz

A star center fielder of a major league baseball team is on top of the world. When he comes out as being gay, his announcement brings forth a variety of reactions from friends, fans and teammates. Reaction turns to violence after a bigoted closing pitcher joins the team. A story about our society, our culture and our national pastime.

Contains mature content.

 Civil War Voices

Staged Reading | Howard Drew Theatre
Written by James R Harris | Music by Mark Hayes | Directed by Jeff Horger

Civil War Voices is a collection of compelling and passionate true stories of real individuals who lived through the Civil War, often using the actual words they left behind in diaries, letters and other writings. This is a creative presentation of the history of the Civil War with chilling stories of battle and death, injustices and hope for the future, all intertwined with songs of that time period.

Appropriate for all audiences.


 The Mildred Project

From the Ground Up | Howard Drew Theatre
Written by Denise Chapman

An official collaboration with the Great Plains Theatre Conference, From the Ground Up is a workshop that provides a safe and nurturing playground for artists to develop new work for the theatre. The playwright’s material will be shared with an audience while still in the developmental phase then will continue to be developed to be included in the next Great Plains Theatre Conference.


 A Steady Rain

Staged Reading | Howard Drew Theatre
Written by Keith Huff | Directed by Christina Rohling

Joey and Denny have been best friends since kindergarten. After working together for several years as police officers in Chicago, they are practically family. Joey helps out with Denny’s wife and kids. Denny keeps Joey away from the bottle. When a domestic disturbance call takes a turn for the worse, their friendship is put on the line as they start a harrowing journey into a dark ethical arena.

Contains mature content.


 New Voices

Special Event | Hawks Mainstage

Meet some of the young artists of Omaha. This special evening will showcase the artistic talents of students from local schools.


 Dogfight

Staged Reading | Hawks Mainstage Theatre
Music and Lyrics by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul | Book by Peter Duchan
Based on the Warner Bros. film and screenplay by Bob Comfort
Directed by Ablan Roblin

It’s November 21, 1963. On the eve of their deployment to a small but growing conflict in Southeast Asia, three young Marines set out for a final night of debauchery, partying and maybe a little trouble. However, when Corporal Eddie Birdlace meets Rose, an awkward and idealistic waitress he enlists to win a cruel bet with his fellow recruits, she rewrites the rules of the game and teaches him the power of love and compassion.

Contains mature content.


 Treasure Island

Staged Reading | Hawks Mainstage Theatre
Written by Ken Ludwig | Adapted from the novel by Robert Louis Stevenson
Directed by Vincent Carlson-Brown

A stunning yarn of piracy on the tropical seas. At the center of this exhilarating tale of swashbuckling mayhem are Jim Hawkins, a 14-year old boy who longs for adventure, and the infamous Long John Silver, who is a complex study of good and evil, perhaps the most famous hero-villain of all time.

Appropriate for all audiences.

 The Patchwork Play Project

Special Event | Hawks Mainstage

A completely original piece of theatre with a twist! Omaha is home to many talented playwrights, both well established and up-and-coming. A group of local talent will be teaming up to write an original play—one piece at a time. One individual will start writing the piece in the summer of 2015. It will be handed off to another writer to continue the story and will continue to be handed off over the course of the year. Where the story goes…nobody knows! Come watch a staged reading of the final project to find out what the creative minds of Omaha can concoct.


Alternative Programming events are free and open to the public with an opportunity for donations. No tickets or reservations are necessary. The 21 & Over readings are intended for mature audiences and discretion is advised.

2015 Staged Reading Auditions June 8 & 9

Beware of the Woolf

Two marriages.  One is irrevocably broken and the other should never have been.  One night the two couples trapped in these marriages get together after a faculty party.  The older couple, George & Martha, engage in a war of words that devolves into a hideous game of one-upmanship in which the younger couple, Nick & Honey, become unwilling pawns.  This is Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? opening Friday in the Howard Drew Theatre at the Omaha Community Playhouse.

Edward Albee’s ability with the written word is second to none.  His writing is lyrical, almost operatic, as each scene is a movement that slowly builds onto the previous until the work reaches its epic crescendo.  To that end, director Hilary Adams has conducted an absolute masterpiece with this work.  Every nuance is so rich and subtle.  Each discovery is fresh and wonderful.  All the actors are so vibrant and mesmerizing.  Mark my words, this play is going to go down as one of the great classics in the illustrious history of the Playhouse.

Passive-aggression, thy name is George.  Brennan Thomas plays this role in the same fashion a violin virtuoso plays a Stradivarius.  Utilizing a clean, simple delivery, Thomas’ George comes off as a quiet, soft-spoken man.  But this soft-spoken nature barely covers a smoldering cauldron of anger and frustration that peeks out when George lets his emotions get the better of him.

Thomas skillfully and nimbly dances from beat to beat and each comment and revelation from George is extemporaneous and original as a result of Thomas’ fine work.  Thomas’ George is quite smug and smarmy.  He knows a lot of fifty dollar words and fires them like bullets from a gun at whoever raises his ire or simply because he can.  However, he also has an unbelievably fragile ego.  Despite his disdain towards his wife, Martha, her opinion actually means something as he melts down like a child when she presses just the right button.  And, like a child, he decides to retaliate with such games as Get the Guests, Hump the Hostess, and a tragically final endgame in Bringing Up Baby.  The only thing keeping Thomas’ performance from perfection is that he needs to increase his volume.  At some points, he was so whisper quiet that it would have been impossible to hear him if not for his naturally strong and carrying voice.

Charleen Willoughby has a career defining performance in the role of Martha.  Ms Willoughby’s Martha is a two fisted drunk and she is only too happy to pummel you with those fists.  As Martha, Ms Willoughby unintentionally fires the first rounds of the war with George by breaking their cardinal rule. . .she talks about their son with Honey.  But she doesn’t shy away from the fight and she fights dirty.

Ms Willoughby is at turns cruel, vixenish, pitiable, and heartbreaking.  With ease, her Martha mocks her husband’s first novel and scoffs at Nick’s inability to “get it up”.  She flirts with and seduces Nick in a very intense makeout session that will make people blush.  She engages in a haunting monologue at the top of Act III where she plays both sides of a conversation with George that shows a longing for something better and she ends the play tragically broken as a result of Bringing Up Baby that will leave you in tears.

There are not enough superlatives to describe Megan Friend’s performance as Honey.  Her talent is simply staggering.  Ms Friend plays Honey as a flakey, less than intelligent, overgrown party girl.  She arrives at the party slightly stewed and is five sheets to the wind by the end of the show.  Honey’s drunkenness is deftly essayed with a loose, awkward body language and spectacularly slurred speech.  Ms Friend also adds a stunning sympathy factor to the role.  You cannot help, but feel sorry at her inability to recognize George’s mockery of her or ignore the sympathy that comes with the understanding of the tragedy that drives her behavior.

I salute Steve Hartman’s heroics in stepping into the role of Nick at the 11th hour.  Hartman replaced the original actor last Friday, leaving him less than a week to prepare this difficult and arduous character.  His performance is not as polished as the other three due to his limited prep time, but he has done some truly excellent work in the short time he had to get ready and this includes the Herculean task of memorizing a sizable chunk of dialogue in 6 days.  By the end of this run, Hartman’s work will easily be on the level of the other 3 actors.

Hartman brings an energy to the role of Nick.  A young genius who got his Master’s degree at the age of 19, Hartman’s Nick is determined to make the most of his career.   He attends this get-together simply because George is a respected associate professor and Martha is the daughter of the university president.  Hartman comes off as politely aloof, at first, as he makes small talk and deflects George’s subtle barbs.  But he’s also got a spine and will stand up for himself as well as defend his wife’s honor, even though it’s implied that he didn’t marry Honey out of love. As the night’s drinking takes effect, Hartman peels off the aloofness and reveals some rather unsavory qualities of Nick such as his eager willingness to take revenge on George by sleeping with Martha, simultaneously revealing that he’s not very dedicated to Honey.  Hartman’s Nick can also be a bit childish such as his excuses for his poor performance in Martha’s bed and his petulant demands that Martha not call him a houseboy (the penalty for the bad performance) in front of George.

Jim Othuse has designed a lovely living room set for this play and Darin Kuehler’s properties give it just the right touch of home.

Albee had a knack for revealing the uglier side of human nature in his writings and this play is certainly no exception.  Yet, in all of the ugliness, there is still a tiny glimmer of hope that these characters can overcome their situations.  The show is an exhausting and emotional roller coaster ride and the audience will be just as exhausted as the actors by the end of it.

“Truth or illusion”, says Martha.  The illusion that is this play actually reveals a lot of truth about the human condition.  You will be changed by watching it and that is what great drama does.

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? plays at the Omaha Community Playhouse from May 8-June 7.  Showtimes are 7:30 pm Thursdays-Saturdays and 2pm on Sundays.  Tickets prices are $36 for adults and $22 for students.  Tickets can be obtained at www.omahaplayhouse.com or call 402-553-0800.  The Omaha Playhouse is located at 6915 Cass Street in Omaha, NE.  This show contains strong language and adult situations and is  meant for mature audiences.

Charming and Challenging Sabrina Fair Amuses and Educates

Sabrina Fairchild, daughter of the chauffeur of the powerful Larrabee family, has returned home (a beautiful courtyard designed by Joey Lorincz) after a 5 year stint in Europe.  Her purpose in coming home is to find out if she is in love with David, the younger son of the Larrabees, but meets her intellectual equal in the Larrabees’ older son, Linus.  The journey to find which son will win her heart is the central plot of Sabrina Fair opening tomorrow at the Bellevue Little Theatre.

On the face of it, it seems a rather simple story, but Samuel Taylor’s script is actually a complex, sophisticated piece of work for the early 1950s.  Taylor bravely challenges the social strata of his day with his writing.  He lived in a time where the rich had their domain, the common people had theirs, and never the twain would meet.  Women were relegated to a secondary status, expected to marry and kow tow to their husbands.  That Taylor would take on this class system and that he would do it through the voice of a strong woman was certainly a bold and daring move.

Taking this message and communicating it in a non-preachy, entertaining way is a difficult task, but director Sonia Keffer does an admirable job doing just that with her well balanced cast.  Ms Keffer’s direction paints a vividly multi-layered picture that is charming, sweet, thought provoking, even a little melancholy.

Mary Trecek is splendid in the title role of Sabrina Fairchild.  Described as shy and mousey before she appears on stage, Ms Trecek’s Sabrina is anything but as she roars onto the stage with a lovely energy and confidence, showing how much the character has been transformed by her 5 years away.

Ms Trecek has created one of the most well rounded characters I have seen on stage in quite a spell.  Her Sabrina is caring, thoughtful, a romantic.  In short, she has the best qualities of the ideal woman of that era.  But she is also intelligent, strong, confident, and determined.  Sabrina wants to live life on her own terms and infect people with the same zest as she possesses.  Yet, in a profound moment, she realizes, “I’ve changed over the past 5 years, but the world hasn’t”.  It doesn’t dampen her faith, but she realizes that she cannot force the world to go on this journey with her.  All she can do is leave the door open and hope the world will follow.

I can’t remember the last time I was so completely blown away by a performance as I was with Will Muller’s interpretation of Linus Larrabee, Jr.  The trick with Linus is that he is a bit of a prick, but has a heart of gold.  As the force behind the successful Larrabee empire, Linus is a guy who does what he pleases and does not care what the world thinks of him.  But he is also fiercely loyal to his family, will do what he believes to be right, and actually is looking for love.  He’s just so used to having to be strong that he doesn’t know how to be vulnerable.  Muller brilliantly walks that tightrope of Linus’ character and expertly peels off Linus’ layers until we see the real man underneath and he does it all with a sardonic half-smile that says more about Linus’ views on life than the dialogue.

Phyllis Bonds is given a remarkable opportunity with the role of Julia Ward McClintock.  I suspect “Aunt” Julia serves as the voice of Taylor himself.  Having been reared in the world of the wealthy, Ms Bonds’ Julia is the character who notices that the times are definitely changing and that the world should not adhere to the class system that it embraced at the time.

Tonight’s performance showed that Ms Bonds has certainly laid the groundwork for a masterful bit of acting.  Julia has some of the best dialogue in the play with her witty zingers and observations and Ms Bonds certainly had a grasp on that wordplay, but she needed a bit more zip to her verbal pitches.  Once she cranks it up a few notches, this is going to be one gutbusting performance.

Janet Macklin and Paul Schneider play the heads of the Larrabee family, Maude and Linus Larrabee, Sr.  I believe these characters are meant to represent society’s thinking at the time as Ms Macklin’s Maude, while likable, is most definitely a snob.  Maude definitely believes that the rich and common folk should remain separate and thinks Sabrina has entrapped her dear little David into marrying her after “having a taste of the high life” in Europe.  But, perhaps echoing Taylor’s own hope that society could change its thinking, Ms Macklin also gives Maude an open-mindedness as she is willing to admit that maybe her thinking is wrong and accepts Sabrina once she has decided between her two boys.

Schneider’s Linus, Sr. also demonstrates this belief in the class system as he is vehemently opposed to the idea of his son marrying the chauffeur’s daughter, but is at least willing to let his son choose his own course.  Schneider also does a fine job serving as the play’s comedy relief as Linus, Sr. is quite a bit of a doddering, old man who forgets names, people, and events (even if they occurred only a few seconds ago).  He even has a most macabre hobby in that he enjoys attending funerals.

Larry Wroten’s Fairchild (Sabrina’s father) serves as an amusing mirror image to Schneider’s Linus, Sr.  Through Fairchild, Taylor takes a beautifully satirical shot at society’s mindset because Fairchild also thinks the rich and the common should not mingle because it would be an insult to the commoners.  I thought Wroten’s performance was a bit wobbly, probably due to opening night jitters.  At points he was laugh out loud funny and, at others, he seemed to lose confidence and sureness of his interpretation.  Another night or two and I think the kinks can, and will, be worked out.

Dan Whitehouse brings a boyish innocence to David Larrabee.  Whitehouse’s David is an incurable romantic.  He falls in love at the drop of a hat and has been divorced, at least once.  But he is also indicative of a changing societal mindset as he doesn’t care about finding someone wealthy.  He wants to marry for love, whether that person is an heiress or a humble daughter of a chauffeur.

The night’s performance did have a few flaws.  The pace was sluggish, especially in the first act.  Cues needed to be tighter.  Volume needed increasing and there was some uneven acting in the supporting cast.  With that being said, I have every confidence that these flaws will shortly disappear and this lighthearted, but deep, comedy will fulfill the great potential it presented tonight.

Sabrina Fair plays at the Bellevue Little Theatre from May 1-17.  Showtimes are Friday & Saturday at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2pm.  The Bellevue Little Theatre is located at 203 W Mission in Bellevue, NE.  Tickets are $15 for adults, $13 for seniors and TAG members, and $9 for students with a valid student ID.  Reservations can be made at 402-291-1554 between the hours of 10am-4:30pm Monday-Saturday.