Harper Lee’s Classic Novel Takes the Stage at Bellevue Little Theatre

Bellevue Little Theatre ( 203 W. Mission Ave in Bellevue, NE) will present the classic the classic and timely  play To Kill a Mockingbird the weekends of Nov. 6-22. Performances are scheduled on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 PM and Sundays at 2:00 PM.

Reservations are strongly recommended and may be made by calling the theatre at 402-291-1554 between the hours of 10 am and 4:30 PM Monday thru Saturday.  Tickets are $18 for adults, $16 for seniors, and $10 for students with proper id.

Lorie Obradovich is directing this classic, with Robin Klusmire and Pam Matney serving as producers. Tony White is stage manager.  Nancy Ross is in charge of costumes and Wes Clowers is the set builder.  Lighting design will be done by Tom Reardon, and sound design by Dan Baye.  Baye will also be sound technician and Wayne Matney will be lighting technician.

Featured in the cast are Jodi Bagley, Mayella Ewell; Dan Baye, Nathan Radley; Phyllis Bonds, Miss Stephanie; John Carlson, Atticus Finch; Karen Codes, Mrs. Dubose; Zoey Dittmer, Scout Finch; Will Jones, Dill Harris; Deb Kelly, Miss Maudie;Paul Kelly, Mr. Gilmore; Fred Kracke, Boo Radley; Tim Livers, Bob Ewell; Manuel Marquez, Clerk; Jarell Roach, Tom Robinson; Phyllis Mitchell-Butler, Calpurnia; Gary Planck, Mr. Cunningham; Carl Brooks, Rev. Sykes; Wes Clowers, Heck Tate; Aidan Schmidtke, Jem Finch; Larry Wroten, Judge Taylor.

Please note that the original language from the novel will be used, and that may be offensive to some.

This drama, based on the acclaimed Pulitzer Award winning novel by Harper Lee, is set in Alabama during the 1930’s.  The play follows Atticus Finch and his crusade to bring justice to a black man accused of raping a white woman.  The ensuing drama brings racial prejudice to the spotlight in the small town.  Atticus struggles to explain his defense of the man to his family, especially to his young daughter, Scout, as she and her brother, Jem, try to understand the problems of injustice which her father is trying to overcome. In addition the children are exposed to a neighbor who is ‘different’, and learn through his actions that ‘different’ doesn’t mean evil or threatening.

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