Get Bent

Max is a liar and con man.  He is also a marked man as Nazi Germany has passed a law outlawing homosexuality and ordering homosexuals rounded up and sent to concentration camps.  Max will do whatever it takes to stay alive and out of the clutches of the Nazis, but one lover will cause Max to hide his true self while another will restore it.  But the cost is terrifyingly high.  Discover the price in Bent by Martin Sherman and currently playing at SNAP! Productions.

Sherman has written a neat little script that abounds with hope, tragedy, and even a touch of comedy along with some nice foreshadowing and surprises.  He also focuses on a lesser known bit of knowledge about Nazi Germany in that homosexuals were just as much of a target as the Jewish people with the twist that this group was viewed even less favorably.  Sherman uses an interesting conceit of having his primary characters have no accents despite their being German natives.  This adds an everyman quality to the characters showing that the evil and persecution they faced was a problem for humanity and not just a localized, national issue for Germany.

This play is uniquely suited to Joshua Mullady’s talents as a director as nobody knows how to craft character conversation scenes quite like him.  This is essential for this particular play as it is almost completely dialogue driven requiring a director who knows how to keep the life and energy pumping through the wordplay.  And Mullady does this in spades with his actors delivering extemporaneous dialogue with some of the sharpest cue pickups I have heard.

The entire cast does a fine job in supporting this story as each adds a precious bit of life to the production and all have absolutely perfect projection.  With that being said, I’d also like to salute Don Harris’ standout cameo performance as a bloodthirsty and psychotic Gestapo guard as he will make your blood boil with his cruelty and viciousness.

Ben Beck doesn’t even seem like he’s acting in this play as he is so natural and believable as Max.  He’s actually quite the scoundrel as he supports himself with cocaine dealing and con jobs and routinely lies like a rug.  But he also shows bits of a tender heart as he tries to help and save the two men in his life.  Unfortunately fate seems bound and determined to work against him as his own survival instinct crooks his efforts. This gives Beck the opportunity to beautifully sell two powerfully emotional scenes at the end of each act that are guaranteed to move even the coldest of hearts.

The two men in Max’s life require a bit of yin/yang quality and that quality is well embodied in the casting of Beau Fisher and Eric Grant-Leanna.

Beau Fisher plays Rudy, Max’s lover before his imprisonment by the Nazis.  Rudy’s function is to let Max be the strong protector.  Fisher embodies Rudy with a childlike innocence and trust in Max.  He is perfectly content to enjoy life as a dancer and watering his plants, fully trusting in Max to take care of the important things to ensure their survival.  But this childlike trust eventually destroys Rudy once he becomes the hunted as his happy-go-lucky existence renders him unable to fend for himself.  When he faces the ultimate challenge on his way to Dachau due to his need for glasses, Fisher’s screams and cries will chill you to the bone and his final fate will reduce you to a puddle of tears.

While Rudy allows Max to be the protector, the function of Horst, Max’s lover in Dachau, is to allow Max to be the protected.  Eric Grant-Leanna skillfully embodies this quality as he teaches Max how to survive in their personal piece of hell.  He’s tough.  He’s knowledgeable.  He’s loving.  He also helps Max to remember who he really is through his love which culminates in an incredibly and intense romantic scene made all the more stunning as it is done solely with the power of voice, words, and imagination as neither Max nor Horst ever touch each other.

I can’t say enough good things about the technical elements of this show.  Ben Adams’ set is a phenomenal, dilapidated flat that transforms into the barbed wire surrounded Dachau and in the midst of it all is the ominous pink triangle which marked all homosexuals in the concentration camps.  Zach Kloppenborg’s costumes are well suited to the era especially the costumes of the prisoners and stormtroopers.  As always, Joshua Mullady’s lights imbue the show with a special bit of life and Daena Schweiger’s sound design further bolsters the play, especially the air horns and crackle of the electrified barbed wire.

Though these voices be of the past, their words still ring loud and clear today. Our world is still very much in a war against evil and this play reminds us that we are still in the thick of a fight.  But it also reminds us that that fight can be won when good people bind together and counter it with faith, hope, peace, and love.

Bent plays at SNAP! Productions through Sept 17.  Showtimes are Thurs-Sat at 8pm and Sundays at 6pm.  Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for students, seniors (55+), TAG members, and military, and $12 for all Thursday shows.   For tickets, call 402-341-2757 or visit www.snapproductions.com.  Due to strong language and mature themes, Bent is not recommended for children.  SNAP! Productions is located at 3225 California Street in Omaha, NE.

Advertisements

‘Eminent Domain’ Conquers the Playhouse

An estranged family reunites to wage battle against an oil company seeking to use eminent domain to claim part of the family’s land.  But the fallout from the court battle and the actions of one of the company’s employees may tear the family asunder once more.  This is the story of Eminent Domain by Laura Leininger-Campbell which is making its world premiere at the Omaha Community Playhouse.

Ms Leininger-Campbell has written an exceptionally thought-provoking and powerful story.  What I found most impressive about the tale was its deceptive simplicity.  Through ordinary conversation, Ms Leininger-Campbell taps into the heart of what it means to be family.  The love.  The banter.  The fights.  The heartache.  The camaraderie.   The unity.  It’s undoubtedly one of the most real and believable plays I have ever seen with a tight, well-balanced script that gives all of its characters a chance to shine.

This strong script is further aided by a cast consisting of the cream of Omaha theatre under the watchful eye of Amy Lane who leads her cast to a series of sterling and stellar performances.

Memorable performances are supplied by Chris Shonka and Christina Rohling.  Shonka plays Trent Nichols, an attorney for the oil company who seems like a decent man who, through business or circumstance, brings the MacLeod family buckets of grief when he files the claim of eminent domain and cuckolds the son of the MacLeod patriarch.  Ms Rohling plays Theresa MacLeod, the unhappy wife of the cuckold who feels like, and is treated as, an outsider by the MacLeods and longs for a better life away from the farm.

My personal favorite performance was Eric Salonis’ interpretation of the autistic Evan MacLeod.  As Evan, Salonis nails the nuances of autism with his completely blank features, failure to make eye contact, laserlike focus on tasks, twitching, monotone speech patterns, and repetitive motions.  Though he often seems in his own world, Salonis’ Evan is more aware of things than one may think as he often tries to help his family through difficult moments by offering them his grandfather’s watch to wind.

Bill Hutson is quite the character as Rob MacLeod.  As the patriarch of the MacLeod clan, he is irascible, foul mouthed, set in his ways, and slightly prejudiced.  Hutson effortlessly swings from one extreme to the other as Rob engages in loud arguments with his family and then, just as easily, sits down for an enjoyable meal with them.  Rob is the type of old-fashioned man who thinks he always has to be strong and in control to lead his family which makes his emotional collapse in Act II all the more heart-wrenching.  But his collapse is what finally allows him to show his real heart and strength.

Erika Hall Sieff is definitely her father’s child as Adair MacLeod.  She is just as stubborn and pig-headed as he is and their similarities led to their long estrangement prior to the events of the play.  Ms Hall Sieff is marvelous as the lawyer who returns home to help save the family farm from the greedy oil company and well embodies Adair’s potent sense of justice.

Jeremy Estill gets the play’s most tragic character in Bart MacLeod.  Estill’s Bart is a borderline, if not full-blown, alcoholic whose drinking hides his frustration at giving up a potential and promising career as a poet to return to the family to help his father, Rob.  Estill’s Bart has an incredible command of the English language which he uses to provide some of the show’s lighter moments and softening some of the darker ones.  Despite his issues, Estill will make you feel Bart’s pain when he learns of his wife’s adultery and finally explains the motivations for his life’s choices.

Technically, this show was a masterpiece.  I was floored by Michael Campbell’s scores and arrangements, especially the driving drumbeat in Act II which supports the play’s darkest moments.  John Gibilisco’s sounds were top notch especially the sound effects of the thunderstorms that served as ominous omens.  Jim Othuse’s farmhouse was a thing of beauty and his lights were wonderful in showing the passage from day to night.  Megan Kuehler’s rural costumes really gave the actors the look and feel of a Nebraska farming family.

Ultimately, this play is a great slice of life story.  While it may sound cliché, you will laugh, cry, and think.  Eminent Domain is a real winner and I am so pleased that the Playhouse took a chance on mounting such an extraordinary story.  Don’t do a disservice to yourself by missing this show.

Eminent Domain runs at the Omaha Playhouse through Sept 17. Performances are Thurs-Sat at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2pm.  Tickets cost $36 for adults and $22 for students.  For tickets, contact the Playhouse at 402-553-0800 or visit www.omahaplayhouse.com or www.ticketomaha.com.  Due to strong language and some mature themes, this show is not recommended for children.  The Omaha Community Playhouse is located at 6915 Cass St in Omaha, NE.

World Premiere Launches OCP’s Season

World Premiere of Eminent Domain

Opens Aug. 25, 2017 at the Omaha Community Playhouse

Omaha, Neb. – The world premiere of Eminent Domain will open the 2017-18 Omaha Community Playhouse season with an August 25 – September 17, 2017 run in the Howard Drew Theatre. Written by Omaha playwright Laura Leininger-Campbell, Eminent Domain tells a relevant story of a Nebraska family farm threatened by the construction of an oil pipeline and the ensuing conflict that emerges within. This 2016 Eugene O’Neill National Playwrights Conference finalist, originally conceived for Shelterbelt Theatre’s Before the Boards series, exposes the hard-fought battle between Nebraska farmers and corporate energy. Disclaimer: Contains adult language

Omaha Community Playhouse’s production of Eminent Domain has been named an official event of the Nebraska 150 Celebration, which is a yearlong celebration across the state of Nebraska in 2017 marking the 150th year of statehood. The Sesquicentennial is a strategic initiative that promotes a spirit of pride, growth, engagement and connection within our state by bridging Nebraskans across different communities, perspectives and cultures. For more information, visit https://ne150.org/calendar/eminent-domain-world-premiere-play/.

Production:        World Premiere of Eminent Domain 

Credits:                By Laura Leininger-Campbell

Director:              Amy Lane

Cast

Bill Hutson as Rob MacLeod

Erika Hall Sieff as Adair MacLeod

Jeremy Estill as Bart MacLeod

Christina Rohling as Theresa MacLeod

Cork Ramer as Cam MacLeod

Judy Radcliff as Jane MacLeod

Eric Salonis as Evan MacLeod

Chris Shonka as Trent Nichols

Thomas Becker as Mateusz Wojciechowski

Show Dates:       Aug. 25-Sept. 17, 2017 (Thursday – Sunday matinee) 

Tickets:                At the OCP Box Office, by calling (402) 553-0800 or online at OmahaPlayhouse.com or www.TicketOmaha.com. Single tickets start at $36 for adults and start at $22 for students. Ticket prices are subject to change based on performance date, seat location and ticket demand. Call the OCP box office for current prices.  For groups of 12 or more, tickets are $24.

Discounts:           Twilight Tickets – A limited number of tickets are available at half price after noon the day of the performance at the Box Office. Cash or check only. Subject to availability. 

Sponsored by:   David and Anne Rismiller

Location:  Omaha Community Playhouse (Howard Drew Theatre), 6915 Cass St, Omaha, NE

Adulting Cartoons

I think my generation was the greatest time to be a kid.  We had skating parties, malls were still solvent, arcades were plentiful, toys were cool, we ran around like loons, and we had the best cartoons.

I loved my cartoons as a kid.  And if you were an 80s kid like me, you know that we had our own special genre of cartoons.  We had G.I. Joe, Transformers, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, Thundercats and many other toy inspired series.  A lot of experts called these shows glorified 30 minute commercials, but I never saw it that way.  I actually enjoyed the stories and the wall to wall action of the shows.  I still have a lot of fond memories of hanging out with friends after school and during the summer where we would watch our afternoon fix of cartoons before going back outside to run amok as only children can.

With the extreme popularity of these series, some of the companies took things one step farther and made animated feature films out of their hit TV shows.  And that’s when things got interesting.  The TV series were clearly geared more towards the kids.  Some cynics may argue that this was done so we kids could pester our parents for the toys once they hit the market.  But the movies were a completely different story.  I think a combination of having a bit more leeway through the medium of film and having to maintain the interest of the adults bringing their children to see said films inspired or compelled the companies to insert a bit more seriousness, emotion, and even more mature themes into the theatrical films.

This article is going to focus on the adult/mature themes added to what I consider to be the three biggest animated films of this genre:  He-Man and She-Ra:  The Secret of the Sword, G.I. Joe:  The Movie, and Transformers: The Movie.

He-Man and She-Ra:  The Secret of the Sword

“Fabulous secret powers were revealed to me the day I held aloft my magic sword and said, ‘By the power of Grayskull!’”—Prince Adam

If you’re of my generation, the preceding quotation is probably pretty familiar to you.  For those of you not in the know, the premise of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe was, as all of these series were, a tale of the battle between good and evil.  Evil, in this case, was represented by the wicked sorcerer, Skeletor, a blue skinned being whose face was literally a skull, as he plotted to conquer the planet of Eternia under the rule of King Randor.  Fighting him all the way was He-Man, the most powerful man in the universe, and the alter-ego of Prince Adam.

The movie and associated TV series were created by Filmation under the auspices of Lou Scheimer who made several successful animated shows during the 1980s.  Scheimer was also known for working on a shoestring budget.  To save costs, he often used the same cels repeatedly and used a tiny cast of voice actors.  He knew how to stretch a dollar because a little went a mighty long way in his shows.

The Secret of the Sword served two purposes.  The first was to say good-bye to He-Man as this movie essentially brought an end to his TV series, though it would continue to air for another six months on TV.  The second was to introduce the character of She-Ra:  Princess of Power.  As toy powerhouse, Mattel, was now going to focus on this toyline, Scheimer had to follow suit and focus on a new TV series.

Thanks to the power of YouTube, I was able to rewatch this film for this article and was surprised at the maturity (some realized and some unrealized) and darkness that was put into this script.

The movie holds up fairly well, though the final half hour feels like padding.  The plot is that the Sorceress of Castle Grayskull has a dream about a child being kidnapped and then a sword that looks remarkably like Adam’s except for a jewel in its center begins to hover and glow before opening a portal doorway.  The Sorceress sends Adam through the portal to find the person destined to hold the sword.

Adam and his cowardly talking tiger, Cringer (who becomes the courageous Battle Cat when zapped by the magic of the Sword of Power) go through the doorway and find themselves in Etheria, a planet ruled by the despot Hordak, a shapeshifting warrior, and his Evil Horde.  Immediately, Adam/He-Man finds himself aiding the Great Rebellion to overthrow Hordak and comes face to face with Hordak’s Force Captain, Adora, who just happens to be the person destined to hold the Sword of Protection.

He-Man learns that Adora genuinely believes the Horde to be the rightful, benevolent rulers of Etheria due to a combination of seclusion inside the Fright Zone and the spells of Hordak’s witch, Shadow Weaver, which make her compliant to Hordak.  However, the presence of the Sword of Protection and her seeing the cruelty of the Horde with her own eyes begin to weaken Hordak’s hold over her.

Ultimately, the Sorceress, through the Sword of Protection, tells Adora that He-Man is her brother and that she has a special destiny “for the honor of Grayskull”.  Once Adora holds up her sword and utters that phrase, she becomes She-Ra, forever breaking Hordak’s grip on her.

From there, the movie follows the standard formula.  The two heroes learn that they are twin siblings.  When they were babies, Hordak attempted to conquer Eternia, but was driven away by King Randor and his troops.  To harm the royal family, Hordak attempted to kidnap the children of Randor and his queen, Marlena, though he only escaped with Adora.  The Sorceress blocked the memory of that event from the minds of everyone except herself, Randor, Marlena, and Man-At-Arms (Randor’s chief scientist and head of the guards).  From there, it’s the tearful reunion with the parents, She-Ra learning about her powers, and, finally, a bittersweet ending where She-Ra opts to stay in Etheria to overthrow Hordak instead of living in Eternia.

Unlike the next 2 films, there is not a lot of mature subject matter in this film, but it is there.  Most importantly is the role of good and evil.  On Eternia, good is the dominant force as the heroes manage to keep Skeletor and his goons in check and the world is ruled by a goodly king.  But on Etheria, evil is the dominant force as the Horde rules the planet.

Because evil rules the land you have a much more compelling villain in Hordak.  Skeletor was depicted as powerful and cunning, but usually incompetent as his plans never succeeded.  Hordak is clearly far more capable as he rules Etheria with an iron fist.

Another mature theme and one I think the movie could have developed to much greater detail is the relationship between the hero and the villain.  On Eternia, He-Man is Skeletor’s greatest nemesis.  But on Etheria, while Hordak clearly hates She-Ra, his personal war is with Adora.

Hordak considers Adora a traitor and for a reason far more powerful than her turning on him and joining the Rebellion.  Early in the movie, when Hordak’s control over Adora weakens, Shadow Weaver attempts to strengthen the spell and is threatened by Adora.  Weaver calmly tells Adora, “Surely you would not harm me, Adora.  Am I not like a mother to you?”  And that is a telling moment.

Shadow Weaver and Hordak raised Adora.  A great deal of who she is is the result of their upbringing.  Hordak doesn’t consider Adora a traitorous soldier. He considers her a traitorous daughter which is a very compelling motive for hatred and one which deserved much deeper exploration.

The next mature theme is the depiction of the real identities of the two heroes.  In order to preserve his secret, Adam often pretends to be lazy and a goof (a burden which I may write about another day).  Adora has the advantage of not having to play a role to protect her secret.  Yes, she keeps her identity under wraps so it cannot be used against her or her friends, but Adora has instant credibility as Hordak’s former Force Captain, so she is immediately accepted as a capable and courageous soldier.

The last adult theme is the ending.  This film has a very sad ending.  After finding his sister, He-Man essentially loses her again as she decides she must remain on Etheria until the Horde has been defeated.  After they bid their farewells, He-Man turns to face the viewer and a single tear rolls down his cheek.  That is the moment I always remembered and it is still pretty powerful.

I actually enjoyed watching this movie a lot more than I thought I would.  It awoke a bit of the kid in me and the adult in me really appreciated the little things the film tried to do to be palatable to the grown-ups.  I must also admit that the movie’s theme is still pretty catchy.

G.I. Joe:  The Movie

“Yo, Joe!!”

That simple battle cry opened up every single episode of the TV series, G.I. Joe and the movie’s plot followed that of the series.  G.I. Joe is a covert military organization dedicated to stopping the terrorist group, COBRA, from conquering the world.

I was never a huge fan of the series, though I did watch a fair number of episodes and I also thoroughly enjoyed the movie as a lad.  The film not only has its own great theme, but it was considerably darker than anything ever tackled in the TV series.  Originally, this film was set to be a theatrical release, but delays in production plus the subsequent financial failure of Transformers:  The Movie caused Sunbow and Hasbro to release this film direct to video.  The film was also bolstered by some star power of its day as Don Johnson voiced Lt. Falcon and the legendary Burgess Meredith voiced Golobulus, the founder of COBRA and ruler of Cobra-La.

The dominant theme of the film was broken families and the dysfunction and healing thereof.  This theme was actually mirrored on both sides of the conflict.  On the side of G.I. Joe, the broken family theme was reflected in Lt. Falcon and Duke, G.I. Joe’s second in command and field leader.  The two were half-brothers, but had an icy relationship.  Duke promised their mother he would watch out for Falcon, but Falcon was hard-headed and a loner and didn’t care much for Duke’s dedication to duty.

On COBRA’s side, the broken family motif was exemplified by Cobra Commander, the one time leader and current second in command of COBRA, and Golobulus.  Cobra Commander had been a favored son of Cobra-La and a top scientist.  After an experiment with mutating spores disfigured him (thus explaining why he always wore a hood or faceplate), he was sent into the outside world to lead COBRA to world domination.  His numerous failures caused him to lose favor with Golobulus and his punishment was to be fully mutated by the spores.

In Falcon’s case, he committed dereliction of duty and Duke pleaded for leniency.  Falcon’s punishment was to be sent to the Slaughterhouse (headed and voiced by Sgt Slaughter) to be re-educated.

As Cobra Commander slowly devolved, he would end up turning on COBRA and helping G.I. Joe in the final assault on Cobra-La.  Falcon would learn what it meant to be part of a team, though it would come at a high cost.

The plot that bound all of this together was G.I. Joe attempting to stop Golobulus from devolving the planet with his mutating spores.

As I previously stated, this film was considerably darker than any episode of the TV series, not only because of the broken families theme, but because of the fate of some of the characters.

Really, the most tragic fate befell Cobra Commander.  As he loses his humanity to the spores, he finally begins to show a spark of it.  We finally get to see his true face in both a flashback, as it shows him before the accident which gave him multiple eyes, and after his faceplate falls off after his punishment as he slowly devolves into a cobra.  There is something truly sad about watching his humanity slip away with his final words being, “Was a man.  Was a man.”  And, yet, he even gets a bit of redemption when, as a full cobra, he finally gets one up on Serpentor, COBRA’s leader, when he prevents him from killing a Joe member.

The other tragedy befell Duke.  During a fight, Falcon is at the mercy of Serpentor before Duke leaps into the fray and engages in a brief, but furious struggle with the Cobra emperor.  In the melee, Serpentor tries to launch a snake spear into Falcon, but Duke dives in the way and takes the spear.  Duke slips into a coma and the team mourns him.  Later it ends happily as we’re told he’s come out of the coma, but it was not originally meant to be this way.

As I earlier stated, this was originally set to be a theatrical release, but delays caused it to be beaten to the punch by Transformers: The Movie.  In the original script, Duke was actually supposed to die.  Woah!!  Now that was serious subject matter for a kid’s flick.  However, when a pivotal character in the Transformers film died, the resulting backlash caused Hasbro to pull the plug on Duke’s death.  They did not reanimate the scenes.  In fact, if you watch the scene where we’re told Duke wakes up from the coma, the reactions of the characters and the music don’t seem to sync up with the good news.  They were actually told he had just died.  A funeral scene was set to take place before the final battle, but it was edited out.  Though I must admit the idea of Falcon and Duke bonding at his death would have packed a better emotional punch.

Aside from the dark fates of the two characters and the broken family motif, this movie was also a bit rougher than the series.  The fights were a little more brutal.  Blood was drawn.  There is even a scene where Falcon pokes out one of Golobulus’ eyes with a wand.  Granted, you don’t see the poke, just its aftermath.  Still this movie did show, that a film could be made that appealed to the kids and could keep the interest of adults.

Transformers:  The Movie

“It’s over, Prime.”—Megatron

This was probably the most ominous sentence ever heard by a kid from my era as it signaled the death of one of the greatest heroes of 80s cartoons.

I was quite surprised to learn that this movie was a box office failure because it has emerged as a cult classic.  This film got everything right from its awesome theme to its almost dystopian flavor to the bud of hope at the end.

The premise of Transformers was simple:  a race of sentient, alien robots are engaged in a civil war and both sides have the ability to transform into vehicles or weapons.  The plot of the film is that the universe is endangered by Unicron, a planet sized Transformer who eats planets.  Desperately the Autobots search for a way to stop this ultimate foe while still fending off the attacks of the evil Decepticons.

The filmmakers didn’t pull any punches with this film.  It took a budget of $6 million (almost six times the cost of a single 30 minute episode) and a period of two years to create this classic.  This film also packed a powerhouse cast including Robert Stack, Eric Idle, Casey Kasem, Judd Nelson, Leonard Nimoy, Lionel Stander, and the final performances of Scatman Crothers and Orson Welles who voiced Unicron.  Despite having his voice electronically altered and boosted due to his failing health, Welles still had that incredible presence which was essential for a living planet.

The movie wastes no time establishing its maturity as one of the first scenes shows the Decepticons slaughtering a group of Autobots.  And slaughtering is indeed the proper word.  As you can see from this clip, the deaths were quite violent.

The movie was notable for two things:  the dropping of the S word by Spike Witwicky after he and Bumblebee failed to destroy Unicron (another mature item) and the death of Optimus Prime, leader of the Autobots.

I cannot stress just how big of an event Prime’s death was.   I remember trailers of the film asking, “Does Optimus Prime die?”  Nobody thought he would die.  Optimus Prime was the man.  He was one of the coolest characters on TV, a true and noble leader, and the Autobots’ best warrior.  One of the best moments of the film is when he single-handedly and systematically dismantles the Decepticons to stop their invasion of Autobot City.  Then he finally has the full blown battle with Megatron which leads to them killing each other.

When Prime actually died on the operating table, you could hear a pin drop in the movie theater.  That’s how serious we kids took it.

Hasbro was unprepared for the backlash resulting from Prime’s death.  The reason all of these Transformers were killed was that Hasbro was planning on releasing a new line of them and they were making room for them which would include a new Autobot leader.  They severely underestimated the love kids had for Optimus Prime.  They were flooded with angry calls and letters from parents and fans.  So severe was the backlash that Hasbro was forced to eventually resurrect Prime in the TV series.

After Prime’s death, the movie focuses on a combo coming of age/redemption story.  The character of Hot Rod felt incredibly guilty for being indirectly responsible for Prime’s death and sought to expiate that guilt.  He redeems himself by stepping up in the war and in battling Unicron and completes his story arc by being selected by the Matrix of Leadership and with the blessing of Optimus to become the Autobots’ new leader:  Rodimus Prime.

I actually own this movie and it is still as good now as it was back then and is a shining example that animation can be used to not only tell a powerful story, but one that can be enjoyed by kids and adults.

In the end I think the adulting of these cartoons actually serve as a metaphor for life.  When we were children, we enjoyed the things of children.  As we grew up, our tastes evolved and changed as did our experiences of the world and these movies represent that evolution with the heavier thematic material.  And ultimately we say good-bye (well, mostly) to the things of our youth just like the good-byes made in these films.  Still it is nice that with these movies, we can go back in time, reclaim a bit of our childhood, and see it with a new understanding granted by life and experience.