Come to “The Mountaintop” at OCP

The Mountaintop_4

Donte Plunkett as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Catie Zaleski as Carnae

Omaha, Neb.— The Mountaintop, which is a fictional telling of  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr,’s final night when he returned to his room at the Lorraine Motel, will run May 4 – 27, 2018 in the Howard Drew Theatre at Omaha Community Playhouse.


An Olivier Award-winning play of historical fiction, The Mountaintop imagines the final night in the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. After giving his speech, “The Mountaintop,” Dr. King returns to his room at the Lorraine Motel. When a mysterious woman with a secret agenda pays a visit to Dr. King, the resulting confrontation imaginatively explores destiny, legacy and mortality.
Disclaimer: Contains dialogue related to racial tension and adult language.

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4. The events in this timely and powerful story take place the night before his death, 50 years ago on April 3, 1968 after Dr. King gave his speech “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop.”

Production:    The Mountaintop

Credits:          By Katori Hall

Director:         Denise Chapman

Cast

Donte Plunkett as Martin Luther King, Jr.

Catie Zaleski as Carnae

Show dates:   May 4 – 27, 2018; Thursdays–Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m.

Tickets:  At the OCP Box Office, by calling (402) 553-0800 or online at OmahaPlayhouse.com or www.TicketOmaha.com. Single tickets start at $24 for adults and $18 for students. Ticket prices are subject to change based on performance date, seat location and ticket demand. Call the OCP box office for current prices. For groups of 12 or more, tickets are $20 for adults and $14 for students.

Sponsors:      Friend of the Playhouse, The Reader (media sponsor)

Location:        Omaha Community Playhouse, Howard Drew Theatre (6915 Cass Street | Omaha, NE 68132)

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Springtime Snowbird: Red Wing, MN & Golden Lantern

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The travel content in my blood had gotten pretty low so I decided it was time to get away for the weekend.  I booked a getaway in Red Wing, MN, home of the Golden Lantern.

While I love travel immensely, sometimes the travel part of travel can get mighty tedious.  My father has an interesting hobby in that he likes to look at atlases to plan his journeys or simply to learn more about the cities that I visit.  When I told him I was heading to Red Wing, I half jokingly asked him if he could plot a route that would be light on interstate.

Dad rose to the challenge and plotted a route.  I asked him how much time this would add to my trip and he asked what time I had planned on getting there.  When I said 3pm, he said I could leave at 6am.  I didn’t particularly relish the idea of tacking an extra 3 hours onto the drive so I figured it would be back to the interstate for me.

A few days before I left, I realized that the route to Minnesota takes me very close to my old hometown of Fort Dodge, IA.  I checked to see how much more time would be added if I went that route and found it would only add an extra hour to the drive.  I contacted my best friend, Josh Kudron, and asked if he wanted to meet me for lunch.  He said yes and I now had a much more satisfying drive on my hands.

It was a very pleasant drive as I drove the route I knew so well, passing through numerous small towns on my way to Fort Dodge.  It had been quite a while since I had visited the old burg and noticed a lot of changes to these small towns.  Just outside of Rockwell City, I found that they were tearing up the highway and had to take a detour which routed me through the tiny town of Rinard and I appreciated adding a new small town to the journey.

I ended up arriving in Fort Dodge about a half hour before I was to meet Josh.  I decided to take a quick jaunt down memory lane and actually get a picture of my first childhood home.  I still remember every nook and cranny of the place.  The house and property had once fallen into quite a bit of disrepair in the years since my family had moved out.  My dad’s lovingly maintained backyard had transformed into an overgrown jungle due to a dispute between the house owners and the owners of the convenience store next door.  At one point, the house had been condemned until it was bailed out by a new owner.

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My childhood home. It’s seen better days, but it’s also seen worse.

The new owner made the house look a lot better with a new siding job and I was stunned to see the backyard restored to quite a bit of its former glory.  I snapped a photo and drove off to my old elementary school.

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This was my old elementary school

The school had once been a Catholic school and church called Holy Rosary, but had been sold off many years prior.  It had been a rehabilitation center for young girls suffering from drug and alcohol addictions before being bought out by an evangelical church and renamed Community Christian School.  Though I only got one photo, a flood of childhood memories washed over me as a lot of the good times spent there ran through my mind.

Then it was time for lunch.  I met Josh at my favorite fast food joint, Taco Tico.  It’s a pity that there are only 16 of these restaurants in the United States because these are the best tacos ever made.  Josh picked up the tab and we spent a long lunch catching up on old times and filling each other in on recent events.  I ended up having to call an end to lunch as I had to get to Red Wing to check in and bad weather was looming.  Keep that last point in mind.

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Ah, Taco Tico!! Yum!!

Now it was off to the interstate to complete my drive to Red Wing.

I arrived in town about 5pm and made my way to the Golden Lantern.  I was greeted by the inn’s owner, Sioux Christensen, and led to my room, J.R.’s Suite.  The room had an incredible calming quality and is very. . .red from thee burgundy curtains and easy chairs to the red blanket on the king bed to the carpeting to the towels.

 

The Golden Lantern is a Tudor Revival mansion that was originally the home of Jesse R (J.R.) Sweazy who was the president of the famed Red Wing Shoe Company which is still in operation today.  The house remained in the family for several generations before his grandson sold the property in 1992 at which point it was renovated into a B & B.

 

I did my normal explorations and helped myself to some cheese and crackers in the living room.  After settling in, I headed to the main drag to have dinner at Bev’s Café.

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Bev’s Cafe

Bev’s is normally only open for breakfast and lunch, but stays open for dinner on Friday nights.  I ordered an Inferno burger with some crinkle cut French fries and I enjoyed a leisurely dinner as I continued reading Ten Little Aliens, a sci-fi retelling of Agatha Christie’s Ten Little Indians.

I returned to the inn after dinner where I put my Jacuzzi tub through the paces, even adding a splash of pomegranate to the water because. . .why not.  I don’t know if it added to my relaxation, but I felt pretty sedate when the bath was over.

From there I posted pictures before going to sleep for the night.

Earlier I had mentioned that bad weather had been looming.  Well, I woke up the next morning to. . .wait for it. . .A SNOWSTORM. . .IN MID-APRIL.  I’m talking a full blown, wind whipping snowstorm which canceled all of my exploration plans for the day.

There are worse things than being forced to stay indoors in a comfortable inn.  Luckily I had arranged for even more relaxation by opting to have breakfast in bed that first day.  A tray was left outside my door at 9am and I enjoyed a long breakfast of bacon, fruit, orange juice, apple cinnamon roll, and a frittata/omelet entrée.

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Afterwards it was pretty much reading, a little TV, and working on the computer for the day.  I did take my car for a brief spin to keep the engine warm, but the wind was whipping around the snow so much that I was only out for 15-20 minutes.

About 5pm, I walked the block to St Joseph’s Catholic Church to attend worship services.  For a small town, the church was surprisingly big.  Almost as big as the church I attend back in Omaha.  The storm had mushroomed into a full blown blizzard threatening to dump up to a foot of snow by 7am the next day.  Due to the storm, less than 50 people attended the service and the sermon and songs were clipped a bit to get us back home.  Still, it was a good service, if a bit edited.

 

I still needed to eat and ending up finding a Perkins nearby where I started reading a new Sherlock Holmes pastiche, The Red Tower, while I ate a Country Club Melt.  After dinner, I noted with relief that the snow had tapered off which gave the city plenty of time to clean up.  This meant I would be able to head for home tomorrow as extending my stay had been a very serious possibility.

I enjoyed another bath and began writing this article before retiring for the night.

When I woke up the next morning, I peeked out my window and noted that the streets were very clean.  Red Wing only got 5 inches of snow, but had I been just an hour west, I would have been buried.  The Twin Cities received a whopping 10.5” of snow and it was still falling.  At this writing, they are up to 18”.

I joined two other couples for breakfast where we enjoyed strawberries and cream, sausage patties, chocolate crepes, and Eggs Benedict.  A nourishing, tasty breakfast indeed.  Some interesting conversation followed and then I made the long drive home.

I’d like to give the city of Red Wing a redo at some point so I can truly experience the city, but the Golden Lantern is a fabulous inn and definitely gets a recommendation for a visit.  From the large rooms and bathtubs to the gourmet breakfasts, you will certainly have a grand and relaxing time.

Until the next time. . .happy travels.

Shelterbelt Boldly Goes Where No Man has Gone Before

SHELTERBELT THEATRE PRESENTS THREE TO BEAM UP BY DON X. NGUYEN,
Dates:  APRIL 20-MAY 13, 2018
Somewhere in the Gamma Quadrant, a distress signal calls…
Shelterbelt Theatre is pleased to present Three to Beam Up by Don X. Nguyen at 3225 California Street, April 20-May 13, 2018.  The play is directed by Roxanne Wach.  Performances are Thurs-Sat at 8pm and Sundays at 6pm except for one matinee performance at 2pm on May 13.  Tickets are $12 for Thursday performances and $20 Thurs-Sun.  Ticket prices for students, seniors (65+), and TAG members are $15.  Tickets are on sale at www.shelterbelt.org (click box office) or boxoffice@shelterbelt.org or 402-341-2757.  The April 21 performance includes a post-show talkback with the playwright, director, and cast.
Sam Wisher returns home to Riverside, IA at the urgent request of his sister.  There, he discovers Jules and their father, John, have built a holodeck and John has locked himself inside for 2 weeks.  Jules and Sam must rescue their father before they lose him forever.  Three to Beam Up is the story of a man who believes he is the Captain of a Federation Starship and the children that fight to keep his feet firmly planted on Earth.
Don’t miss the world premiere of this play by former Omahan, Don X. Nguyen.  Originally performed as part of the 1999 Shelterbelt season, Nguyen has completely rewritten the original play as part of the Shelterbelt’s 25th season.  “I wrote this play about sixteen years ago when I was running the Shelterbelt Theatre.  I came up with this crazy idea of a father who thinks he’s a captain of a starship and started to explore that further and it quickly turned into a play about my family and the fact that, growing up, my parents worked all the time.  I’d hardly see them and that kind of pushed me to interrogate this notion of absent parents and the children who are left behind.”
“I remembered the original production and suggested it to our reading committee.  I thought it would be fun to bring it back, but give Don a chance to revisit it.  It’s been exciting exploring this new script and seeing how Don’s work has evolved.  The play has such a great mix of family drama, comedy, and Star Trek,” said Roxanne Wach, director.
“The script didn’t really age well,” continued Nguyen.  “It’s the very first full length play I’d ever written so there were a ton of rookie mistakes.  I knew it wouldn’t work in its current form.  This upcoming production at the Belt gave me a chance to do a page one rewrite of the script and really delve into the emotional connections of my characters.  One priority for me was to strengthen all my female characters and I’m really happy with where they ended up in this new version.”
The Shelterbelt production comes on the heels of the world premiere of Nguyen’s play, Hello, From the Children of Planet Earth, performed Off-Broadway at The Playwrights Realm in New York City.
“It’s very exciting to be able to come back to Omaha and, particularly, the Shelterbelt.  I haven’t stepped foot inside the theatre since I moved to New York City twelve and a half years ago,” said Nguyen.
The cast features Pam Chase, Nathan Dunham, Kevin Goshorn, John Haverkamp, Matt Karasek, Willa Rauch, Meganne Horrocks Storm, AJ Stoscher, and Brennan Thomas.  Mary Beth Slater stage manages with set design by Ben Adams, costume design by Erienne Wredt, lighting design by Laura Arias, sound design and original music by Shannon Smay, assistant lighting designer is Taelore Stearns, and props/set dressing by Roxanne and Dan Wach.
In the gallery:  Carl Dumicich, mixed media
Shelterbelt Theatre is Omaha’s home for new plays.  Three to Beam Up is part of Shelterbelt’s 25th season, Original Lives Here, featuring scripts celebrating our local playwrights, past and present.  Shelterbelt Theatre is a 2015 and 2016 recipient of the international 50/50 Applause Award by the International Centre for Women Playwrights which honors theatres that produce a season with an equal or greater number of plays written by female playwrights. (www.womenplaywrights.org)

The Bard Makes a Regional Premiere at OCP

SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE

Opens April 13, 2018 at the Omaha Community Playhouse

Omaha, NE. – Shakespeare in Love, a play based on the Academy Award-winning film, will run April 13 – May 6, 2018 at the Omaha Community Playhouse in the Hawks Mainstage Theatre.

Based on the Academy Award-winning film by Tom Stoppard and adapted by Lee Hall (Billy Elliot), Shakespeare in Love is a love letter to the stage and a celebration of theatre, music and human connection. While the government threatens to close all theaters, young Will Shakespeare suffers from writer’s block, as his muse Viola disguises herself as a man to pursue her dreams of being an actor. Amidst mistaken identities, ruthless scheming, backstage theatrics and a misbehaving dog, Will’s love for Viola quickly blossoms and inspires him to write his greatest masterpiece.
Disclaimer: Contains scenes of sexuality.

To celebrate Shakespeare in Love, Omaha Community Playhouse will hold an opening night celebration from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 13 free to that evening’s ticket holders. No reservations necessary. Attendees will enjoy a Shakespearean celebration, including snacks, treats, games and appearances by entertainers from the Renaissance Festival of Nebraska. It’s like a mini-faire right in the lobby.

Production:  Shakespeare in Love

Credits:  Based on the Screenplay by Marc Norman & Tom Stoppard | Adapted for the stage by Lee Hall | Music by Paddy Cunneen | Based on the Academy Award-winning film starring Gwyneth Paltrow and Joseph Fiennes

Director:  Jeff Horger

Cast

Jacob Roman as Will Shakespeare

Alissa Harnish as Viola de Lesseps

Janet Macklin as Queen Elizabeth

Kevin Barratt as Richard Burbage

Bradley Alexander as Wabash

Caitlin Mabon as Sir Robert

Chloe Irwin as John Webster

Christopher Scott as Philip Henslowe

Craig Bond as Ralph

Danielle Smith as Edmund Tilney

Sydney Readman as Lord Wessex

Ron Boschult as Fennyman

Will Rodgers as Sam

Jeremy Earl as Christopher “Kit” Marlowe

Julie Fitzgerald Ryan as Nurse

Michael Leaman as Ned Allen

Ensemble features Jenna Hager, Olivia Howard, Sean Johnson, Samantha Johnson, Alex Nilius, Pamela Scott, Dennis Stessman, and Catherine Vazquez

Apollo the dog as Spot the dog

Show dates: April 13 – May 6, 2018; Wednesdays–Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2:00 p.m.

Tickets:  At the OCP Box Office, by calling (402) 553-0800 or online at OmahaPlayhouse.com or http://www.TicketOmaha.com. Adult single tickets start at $24 for Wednesday performances and start at $32 for Thursday – Sunday performances. Student single tickets start at $18 for Wednesday performances and start at $22 for Thursday – Sunday performances.

Ticket prices are subject to change based on performance date, seat location and ticket demand. Call the OCP box office for current prices.  For groups of 12 or more, tickets are $22 for Wednesday performances and $28 for Thursday – Sunday performances.

Discounts:  Twilight Tickets – A limited number of tickets are available at half price after noon the day of the performance at the Box Office. Cash or check only. Subject to availability.

Wednesday Performances – Discounted tickets are available for Wednesday performances only starting at $24 for adults and $18 for students.

Whatta Deal Wednesday – Discounted tickets for $10 will be available for the first Wednesday performance on Wednesday, April 18, 2018. $10 tickets will be available in person at the box office starting at 4:00 p.m. the day of the show.

Sponsors:  Immanuel Communities (Series Sponsor), Conagra Brands Foundation (Producing Partner), Cindy and Scott Heider (Specialty Sponsor) and KETV (Media Sponsor)

Location:  Omaha Community Playhouse, Hawks Mainstage Theatre (6915 Cass Street | Omaha, NE 68132)

Upcoming Auditions

CIRCLE THEATRE PRESENTS AUDITIONS FOR
A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM

Circle Theatre will hold auditions for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” running May 4-19.

Auditions will be held March 26th and 27th at 7:00p.m.

Please bring a calendar and a list of ALL conflicts from April to May.
The show opens May 4 and runs through May 19, 2018.
Performances are Friday and Saturday evenings at 7:30 and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 for two weekends.

Those auditioning will be asked to read from the script.
The Circle Theatre is committed to diverse, inclusive casting, and auditions are open to all.

Synopsis:
When the merry sprite Puck meddles with a magical love potion, young lovers lost in the woods mysteriously find themselves infatuated with the wrong person in this hilarious, fairytale fantasy that proves the course of true love never did run smooth.

Auditions will be held at Hanscom Park United Methodist Church at 4444 Frances Street.
For more information, please contact Circle Theatre at circle.theatreomaha@gmail.com

OMAHA COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE PRESENTS
THE 2018-2019 SEASON MUSICAL ADULT AUDITIONS

Saturday, May 12, 11:30 a.m. check in, 12:00 p.m. start
Sunday, May 13, 5:30 p.m. check in, 6:00 p.m. start

Omaha Community Playhouse will hold adult and youth season musical auditions for all five musicals for the 2018-2019 season in May, including auditions for Fun Home, Shrek The Musical, A Christmas Carol, The Bridges of Madison County and Ragtime. Actors interested in these shows should plan to attend. Omaha Community Playhouse is committed to diverse, inclusive casting.

What:  2018-2019 Season Musical Adult Auditions
Who: For actors 16 years and older of all genders and ethnicities
Location: Omaha Community Playhouse | 6915 Cass Street | Omaha, NE 68132
Those auditioning should enter through the main lobby entrance and proceed to the check-in table.

Requirements:
Actors please be prepared with the following:
* Sheet music with 16 bars ready to sing (an accompanist will be provided)
* There will be a dance audition, so actors should be dressed to move (no boots, sandals, flip-flops, etc.)
* You will be asked to fill out an audition form, please have all necessary contact information and schedules available to complete the form.
* A recent photo to attach to your audition form. Please note, the photos do not need to be professional and will not be returned.
* Should you not have a photo, one will be taken at the time of the audition.

Show Dates:
Fun Home
 – August 17 – September 16, 2018, (Howard Drew Theatre)
Shrek The Musical – September 14 – October 14, 2018 (Hawks Mainstage Theatre)
A Christmas Carol – November 16 – December 23, 2018 (Hawks Mainstage Theatre)
The Bridges of Madison County – March 1 – 24, 2019 (Hawks Mainstage Theatre)
Ragtime – May 31 – June 30, 2019 (Hawks Mainstage Theatre)

There will be additional auditions held at later dates throughout the season for the following non-musical productions: She Kills Monsters, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Of Mice and Men, One Man, Two Guvnors and Men on Boats, as well as Alternative Programming auditions. Those dates will be announced at a later time.

Omaha Community Playhouse is committed to diverse, inclusive casting.

Contact:
For more information, contact Breanna Carodine, bcarodine@omahaplayhouse.com, at (402) 553-4890, ext. 110.

Opening the Windows to the Soul

Painter Jamie Wyeth decides to paint a portrait of famed ballet dancer, Rudolf Nureyev.  What begins as an opportunity for both men to obtain what benefits he can from the other evolves into a lifetime friendship.  If only Wyeth can unlock the means of painting Nureyev’s Eyes by David Rush and currently playing at the Blue Barn Theatre.

Rush has written an elegant script that is beautiful in its simplicity.  This is a story of friendship.  But the simple story contains profound depth as the friendship between Wyeth and Nureyev grows.  Over the course of the play both men slowly peel off their layers, revealing more and more of themselves to the other.  Rush’s words perfectly capture the essence of the mercurial Nureyev and the more laid back Wyeth with a real and natural conversational tone.  It’s sad.  It’s charming.  It’s witty.  It’s dark.  It’s light.  In short, it has all of the elements for a strong and compelling story.

Darin Anthony unlocks the full potential of Rush’s words with a stunning piece of direction.  I often forgot I was watching a play as the conversation between his two actors was so believable.  The conversations sparked with a vitality as the two performers run the whole gamut of friendship when butting heads due to each being “artist mad”, sharing meaningful talks over brandy, and revealing parts of themselves that they would prefer to remain hidden.  The staging is absolutely magnificent especially with the constant motion of Nureyev who said he could not sit still for a portrait.  Anthony leads his actors to pristine performances chock full of nuance and skill.

Sam Woods excels as Jamie Wyeth.  What I found especially compelling about Woods’ performance is that he portrays Wyeth as an everyman.  Despite being a descendant of a successful line of artists, Wyeth is still a regular guy, comfortable in torn jeans and a blue work shirt.  That doesn’t mean that he doesn’t take immense pride in his work.  He is fully aware of his talent and refuses to let the legendary Nureyev intrude on his domain.  Woods’ Wyeth is also more than up to the challenge of keeping up with Nureyev’s intellect as he matches him riddle for riddle with a sly smile.

Woods’ calmness as Wyeth serves as a good counterbalance to the fiery Nureyev as he is able to shrug off his temper tantrums and earn his respect to even begin this project, let alone keep it alive for so many years.  Some of the show’s best scenes include their ordinary conversations which serve the dual purpose of helping Wyeth get an idea as to how to paint Nureyev as well as expanding their bonds of friendship.

How do I best describe Jed Peterson’s turn as Rudolf Nureyev?  I think the closest analogy I can find is to imagine putting a cork into Old Faithful and then watch as that mighty geyser surges against the cork, threatening to blow at any moment.  Peterson has an energy that you can almost see and feel and it seems like he is barely able to keep it contained.  Indeed, without the occasional release of a tantrum, a riddle, apple pie and ice cream, or dance, it would seem that Peterson’s Nureyev would literally blow up.

Peterson doesn’t play Nureyev.  He IS Nureyev.  Peterson perfectly captures the force of nature that was Nureyev.  He is temperamental.  He is fierce.  He is cultured.  He is smart.  He is witty.  He is driven.  But in just the right moments, he can also be soft and peaceful.  He’s also an amazing dancer.

Peterson paints a portrait of a man who is never truly happy due to his never being able to fully trust anyone and only truly feels free when he dances.  Still his Nureyev opens up to Wyeth more than he has any other person, yet still doesn’t reveal all.  Peterson’s best moments occur when his Nureyev lets down some of his guard and reveals some of his true self.  His fears.  His loves.  His humanity.

The technical elements of the show were just as strong as the storytelling.  Kathy Voecks has designed a wonderful set consisting of pillars of sketches, charcoal drawings, and paintings.  Craig Marsh’s sound design was top notch, especially his use of 70s rock numbers.  Jill Anderson’s costuming was more than up to the task especially with the 70s mod fashion worn by Nureyev.  Ernie Gubbels’ lighting was impressive.  Most notable was his use of shadows which often made the two actors look like living Wyeth paintings and his use of disco lights during the first meeting between Wyeth and Nureyev.

This show is the essence of theatre.  It’s just real.  And it tells a touching story of friendship between two men from different cultures bound by the brotherhood of mad artistry.

Nureyev’s Eyes plays at the Blue Barn through April 15.  Showtimes are 7:30pm Thurs-Sat and 2pm on Sundays.  There are no performances on March 25 or April 1.  Tickets cost $30 for adults and $25 for seniors (65+), students, and TAG members.  For reservations, call 402-345-1576 or visit www.bluebarn.org.  The Blue Barn is located at 1106 S 10 St in Omaha, NE.

Sioux Empire Community Theatre Needs Your Help

REBUILDING OUR THEATRE.

REBUILDING YOUR TRUST.

The Sioux Empire Community Theatre is facing a very real financial struggle.  Ticket sales have not been sufficient to cover the cost of theatrical productions, and costs continue to rise.  We will not be able to take the stage in the Fall without your help.

The Theatre must build stronger relationships with donors, patrons, and volunteers, and increase corporate sponsorships to make it to the stage for Season 16.  Under new leadership, we are rebuilding these bridges and donations are coming in.  Will you join us?

The Theatre Board has put measures in place to restructure our business practices, control costs, and ensure we can rebuild a strong, sustainable community theatre in 2018.  Our goal is to raise $100,000 by April 30.  Please help us spread the word! 

HOW CAN I HELP?

Donations are needed!  Our goal is to raise $100,000 by April 30.  You can donate online through our secure PayPal link, on facebook.com/siouxfallstheatre or at siouxfallstheatre.com.  We have been blessed with volunteers organizing benefits for the theatre and offering to join our new volunteer teams!  To volunteer, email your contact information to info@siouxfallstheatre.com.

SPONSORSHIPS

The Sioux Empire Community Theatre relies on Corporate Sponsors to support children’s programs, donor and volunteer communications, and for performance sponsorships.  For information, please contact Kristen Townsend, our Volunteer Interim Executive Director at kristen@siouxfallstheatre.com or 605-254-5274. Thank you for coming alongside us as we rebuild this vital volunteer organization!

 

Sioux Empire Community Theatre

Orpheum Theatre Center

315 N. Phillips Avenue, P.O. Box 767

Sioux Falls, SD 57101

605.360.4800

info@siouxfallstheatre.com

 

SIOUXFALLSTHEATRE.COM

Kristen Townsend

Volunteer Interim Executive Director

kristen@siouxfallstheatre.com

605-254-5274