The Sun Will Come Out. . .Sept 13. . . at OCP

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Stella Clark-Kaczmarek as Annie and Toby as Sandy

Omaha, NE–Heartwarming musical Annie will open Friday, Sept 13 at the Omaha Community Playhouse.  The show will run in the Hawks Mainstage Theatre from Sept 13 through Oct 13.  Performances will be held Wed-Sat at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2pm.

Annie is the beloved tale of a young girl who never gives up hope of one day reuniting with her parents.  After enlisting the help of Depression-era billionaire Oliver Warbucks, Annie finds herself in a tangled web of con artists, kidnappers, and–worst of all–Miss Hananigan!  With a little help from her orphan friends and her dog, Sandy, Annie ultimately finds a place where she belongs in this heartwarming classic.  Featuring timeless songs like “Tomorrow” and “It’s the Hard Knock Life”, Annie has been delighting audiences of all ages for decades.

Tickets are on sale now starting at $32 for adults and $20 for students with prices varying by performance.  Tickets may be purchased at the OCP Box Office, located at 6915 Cass Street, by phone at 402-553-0800, or online at http://www.omahaplayhouse.com.

Directed by:  Kimberly Faith Hickman

Cast

Stella Clark-Kaczmarek as Annie

Jay Srygley as Daddy Warbucks

Angela Jenson Frey as Grace Ferrell

Allison Wissman as Miss Hannigan

Christopher Violett as Rooster

Cathy Hirsch as Lily

Brinlee Roeder as Molly

Olivia Bryant as Pepper

Cleo Washington as Tessie

Pieper Roeder as Kate

Amina Teri as July

Madalynn Johnson as Duffy

And an ensemble featuring Marcus Benzel, Mark Haufle, Peter Barrett, Jared Dominguez, Sadie Langemo, Mary Trecek, Isabelle Rangel, Serena Johnson, Brittney Thompson, Carrie Trecek, Aidan Schmidtke, Andrew Schnitker, Sheldon Ledbetter, Judson Cloudt, Otto Fox, Meghan Essner, Anina Frey, Annabella Mosher, Lily Sanow, Sophia Srygley, Madison White, Andrew Karolski, Camden Park, Will Seim.

Photo provided by Colin Conces Photography

 

OCP Announces Auditions for ‘Sweat’ and Musical Auditions for 95th Season

Auditions for Sweat by Lynn Nottage
Thursday, May 2nd at 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, May 4th at 1:00 p.m

Those auditioning should enter through the west “Stage Door” entrance and proceed to the check-in table downstairs.

Show Dates: August 16 – September 15, 2019 in the Howard Drew Theatre

Director: Susie Baer Collins

Rehearsals: Begin approximately mid June 2019

Description: Winner of the 2017 Pulitzer Prize, SWEAT is a head-first dive into working class America. A three-time Tony Award® nominee, SWEAT follows a group of steelworkers whose steady march toward the American dream is uprooted by economic change. As their sense of security slowly unravels, jobs and relationships are left in the wake. Punctuated with lively humor, SWEAT goes to the heart of what it means to be human—both good and bad—when fear and uncertainty take hold. Disclaimer: Contains adult language and violence.

Roles:

Evan, African-American, forties

Jason, white American of German descent, twenty-one / twenty-nine
Chris, African-American, twenty-one / twenty-nine
Stan, white American of German descent, fifties
Oscar, Colombian-American, twenty-two / thirty
Tracey, white American of German descent, forty-five / fifty-three
Cynthia, African-American, forty-five / fifty-three
Jessie, Italian-American, forties
Brucie, African-American, forties

Notes:

Those auditioning will be asked to read from the script provided at auditions

What to Bring:

All contact information, personal schedules and a list of rehearsal conflicts with which to fill out an audition form.

To expedite the check-in process – please bring a recent photo if you have one available. Please note, photos will not be returned.
2019/2020 Season Musical Auditions
Adult (16 or older) auditions:
Saturday, June 15th at 11 a.m.
Sunday, June 16th at 6 p.m.
Youth (under 16) auditions:
Saturday, June 22nd at 11 a.m.
Actors interested in Annie, The Rocky Horror Show, A Christmas Carol, Once, Bright Star and The Color Purple should plan to attend. Actors should enter through the main lobby on the south or east side of the facility.

Once will include actors playing instruments. If you are interested in this specific musical and have an instrument, please bring the instrument with you and be prepared to play 16 bars of music of your choice. You may also accompany your own singing audition if you prefer.

Actors please be prepared with the following:

  • Sheet music with 16 bars ready to sing (an accompanist will be provided)
  • ONCE the musical will include actors playing instruments. If you are interested in this specific musical and have an instrument, please bring the instrument with you and be prepared to play 16 bars of music of your choice. You may also accompany your own singing audition if you prefer.
  • There will be a dance audition, so actors should be dressed to move (no boots, sandals, flip-flops, etc.)
  • You will be asked to fill out an audition form, please have all necessary contact information and schedules available to complete the form.
  • A recent photo to attach to your audition form. Please note, the photos do not need to be professional and will not be returned.
*Audition dates are subject to change
Location:  Omaha Community Playhouse (6915 Cass St, Omaha, NE)

Forget About Tomorrow, “Annie” Shines Today

At the height of the Great Depression, Little Orphan Annie is giving hope to the populace one song and optimistic outlook at a time as she searches for her own parents.  When she meets crusty billionaire Oliver Warbucks, there may be a light at the end of the tunnel. . .for both of them.  This is Annie:  The Musical by Thomas Meehan with music by Charles Strouse and lyrics by Martin Charnin.  It is currently playing at the Rochester Civic Theatre.

The script and score of this show almost feel like a draft as opposed to a final product.  The script is definitely cute and has several amusing, breaking the fourth wall moments.  Likewise, most of the songs are catchy and memorable, if reprised a bit much.  With that being said, the script also lacks a little in character development and fails to further several ideas it introduces.  For example, it’s clear that Annie has a transformative effect on the lives of the people she meets, but we only get to see the aftermath of her charm on people and never the transformative process itself.

Fortunately, the cast and crew are able to perform a bit of Annie magic on the script’s shortcomings.

Under the steady direction of Lee Gundersheimer, this show assuredly becomes more than the sum of its parts.  Gundersheimer guided his troupe to solid, effective performances.  He also has a sure sense of staging with good utilization of the theatre space.  One of the strongest staging moments was the orphans entering Warbucks’ house for Christmas.  Every possible entrance point was used including the auditorium and orchestra pit.

I salute the chorus of this production as they helped to animate the group scenes with the little bits of business crucial to creating this world.  Some standout performances came from Alyssa Keller who shines in a solo (and demonstrates unbelievable breath control) in “N.Y.C.”; Chad Campbell and Gabrielle Hensrud as the slimy, swindling couple, Rooster and Lilly St Regis; Rocco Ruggeri is spot on as the puppeteer for Sandy the dog; and I was especially impressed with Jessica Carey’s performance as Molly.  Though she be tiny, she is fierce as she has an exceptional sense of comedic timing and a larger than life presence.

Shea Morrey makes for an utterly natural Annie.  She’s adventurous.  She’s friendly.  She’s gutsy.  She’s feisty.  She’s determined.  She’s sweet.  I couldn’t help but smile at her nearly limitless optimism and she has a deadly accurate singing voice which soared in “Tomorrow” and “I Think I’m Gonna Like it Here”.  She just needs to be certain to keep up the breath support in some of her higher registers.

Mark Morrey is pretty darn good as Oliver Warbucks.  I liked his firm, but fair take on the character.  Arguably, Warbucks is the most developed character in the show as he begins as being focused solely on his business, but peels off the layers to show a terribly lonely man who has a lot more in common with Annie than one would think.  Morrey is permitted to give Warbucks some surprisingly deep moments with “Something Was Missing”.  I also liked how he adapted his singing to the character voice he used for Warbucks, managing to be on key, yet sound as if he were off key at the same time.

Emily Watkins very nearly steals the show as Miss Hannigan.  Ms Watkins clearly had a ball with the role as the drunken, cruel head of the orphanage who forces her wards to clean the orphanage every single day, works them in a sweatshop, and shamelessly throws herself at any man with a pulse who walks through the door.  Ms Watkins skillfully takes this role right to the very brim to the cup, but never goes over the top.

Ellen Huston has supplied a pretty nifty piece of choreography, especially in two show stopping numbers with the children, “It’s a Hard Knock Life” and “Fully Dressed”.  Sarah Wood Lieske and her orchestra provided a spritely night of music.  Kevin Dobbe and Doug Sween make for a good tandem with the set.  Dobbe’s projections of NYC, alleys, and bridges melded well with Sween’s bunk beds, lavish Warbucks mansion, and conference table of FDR’s Cabinet room.  Marco Magno’s costumes were of excellent quality with the rags of the homeless, the cheap clothes of the orphans, and the elegance of the Warbucks household.  Paul Sund’s lights were exceptional and well suited to each scene and emotional beat of the play.

The show definitely needed much tighter cue pickups last night, but the warm and winning cast has provided a real crowd pleaser for the holiday season.

Annie:  The Musical plays at the Rochester Civic Theatre through December 16.  The show is sold out for the remainder of the run.  Rochester Civic Theatre is located at 3773, 20 Civic Center Dr in Rochester, MN.

The Small Town Life: Charlie & Jane’s Bed & Breakfast

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It was certainly a fine day to be answering the call of the road.  Despite it being July 4, the weather was like a perfect spring day.  The drive was smooth and sure and the scenery was peppered with plenty of lush foliage.  Thus marked my journey to Mount Ayr, IA, the home of Charlie & Jane’s Bed and Breakfast.

A big part of what I like about bed and breakfasts is that it’s like a home away from home.  And this was truer than usual for Charlie & Jane’s.  Many of the bed and breakfasts I’ve visited are almost like museums in the sense that they are completely restored, opulent homes with furnishings to match.  It’s almost like stepping back in time.  However, Charlie & Jane’s is like stepping into a Norman Rockwell painting.  It’s a humble little slice of Americana like going to Grandma’s house.

In fact, images of my grandparents’ home lept into my mind when I arrived at this fine establishment.  Before I could even ring the doorbell, I was greeted by Collus Lawhead, one of the owners.  With a firm handshake, he welcomed me into his home and led me to my temporary home of the Rhoades Suite (pictured below).

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Yes, memories of visiting my grandparents flooded into my mind as I gazed about the room.  Even more impressive was that the room contained one of the cookbooks written by the late actor & gourmet cook, Vincent Price.  I may have to see about getting a copy of that book for myself because that man wrote some fabulous recipes.

After settling in, I went downstairs where I was greeted by the other owner, Jane Lawhead.  She told me of the 4th of July activities taking place in Clearfield, IA and graciously provided me with a folding chair  in case I wanted to drive down there and watch the fireworks.

By visiting on the 4th of July, I had hoped to see some small town festivities, but discovered that the counties in this region take turns hosting major holidays.  Because of that, the noninvolved counties completely shut down.  Businesses, restaurants, even movie theaters were all closed for the day.  Unfortunately, that meant I couldn’t experience any of the small town life that I look forward to on these excursions.  Hopefully, I will be able to return at some point and have the proper experience.

I was able to do a little exploration.  I wandered about the town square and marveled at the very impressive library.  How I wish it had been open so I could have done a little perusing.

Fortunately, the inn more than made up for any lack of activities.  The room was very comfortable and contained the most comfortable bed I have ever slept in.  When I went to sleep for the night, my eyelids didn’t even flutter until the next day when I awoke to a thunderstorm.

When I went downstairs for breakfast, I met Bob Tribblett and Georgie Scurfield, who were staying across the hall.  Amazingly, Bob and Georgie were from my neck of the woods as they live in Papillion, NE.  Bob is retired Air Force and Georgie is the treasurer for the Papillion-LaVista Community Theatre which is getting ready to open Annie.

What followed was one of the most splendid breakfast conversations I have enjoyed.  Bob & Georgie told me how they met and we spent much of the time talking about the local theatre scene.  And breakfast was a magnificent meal.  Over glasses of coffee, orange juice, and water, we enjoyed fresh fruit and raspberry coffee cake.  The main course was an omlette that was more like a pie as two crusts of egg contained the tasty filling of cheese, tomatoes, celery.  On the side was bacon made just the way I like it, firm, but chewy.

Thanks to Jane introducing me to the Iowa Bed & Breakfast Association, I have also been able to expand my search list by a great deal and will be able to continue this project for a good many months.  If you find yourself in Mount Ayr, stay for a night at Charlie & Jane’s.  You’ll be glad you did.

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