The Show is Redux, But the Cast is Brand New!

BLUEBARN Theatre Proudly Presents:

Every Christmas Story Ever Told (and then some!)

By Michael Carleton, James FitzGerald, and John K. Alvarez

Omaha, NE: Instead of performing Charles Dickens’ beloved holiday classic for the umpteenth time, three actors decide to perform every Christmas story ever told –plus Christmas traditions from around the world, seasonal icons from ancient times to topical pop-culture, and every carol ever sung. A madcap romp through the holiday season, this laugh-out-loud. Comedy offers a hilarious alternative to anthropomorphic Nutcrackers and singing Victorian children.

Directed By: Bill Grennan
Starring: Jonathan Purcell, Jimmy Nguyen, and Joshua Orsi

Performances & Tickets: Nov. 25 –Dec. 18, 2022 | Thurs-Sat @ 7:30pmSun., Nov. 27, Dec. 4, 11, 18 @ 2:00pm; Sun., Dec. 4 @ 6:00pm *ASL Performance Thurs., Dec. 1

General Admission($37) and Educator | Healthcare | Military($32)

Tickets are available at bluebarn.org or through the box office @ 402.345.1576

It’s Your Constitutional Right to Audition for this Show

BlueBarn Theatre Announces Auditions for:

What the Constitution Means to Me

About the Play: Fifteen year old Heidi earned her college tuition by winning Constitutional debate competitions across the United States. In this hilarious, hopeful, and achingly human new play, she resurrects her teenage self in order to trace the profound relationship between four generations of women and the founding document that shaped their lives. Hailed as the best play of the year in 2019 by the New York Times and earning two Tony Award nominations, this boundary-breaking play breathes new life into our Constitution and imagines how it will shape the next generation of Americans.

Audition Dates: Nov 5 from 10am-12:30pm and Nov 7 from 5pm-7:30pm at BlueBarn Theatre (1106 S 10th St, Omaha, NE)

Director: Susan Clement

Rehearsal Dates: January 1 – February 1
Production Dates: February 2 – February 26

***All artists working at the BLUEBARN are required
to have been vaccinated for COVID-19***

Roles

Heidi Schreck: Woman, age 35-50 (possible double cast role).  A former teen debate champion who travelled the country giving speeches about the Constitution who is now reflecting upon those speeches and her present views. Engaging, dynamic, smart, and witty.

American Legionnaire: Man, age 35-50.  An American Legionnaire monitoring the speech and debate who is also a friend of Heidi and a positive male energy. Commanding, in-charge, yet reflective and genuine.

Debater: Young Woman, age 14-17  (this role will be double cast).

Auditions will consist of prepared sides, and cold readings from the script. Prepared monologues under 2 minutes are welcome, though not required. Tell us a joke! For more information on auditions or to request a copy of the script and sides, contact Amy Reiner at areiner@bluebarn.org

The Frailty of the King

An aging king decides to retire and divide his land between his three daughters, but first requires his daughters to make a declaration of love to him in order to determine which one loves him best.  This requirement triggers a series of events that cause the land to descend into chaos, war, betrayal, madness, and death.  This is King Lear and it is currently playing at the BlueBarn.

It’s been said that the tragedies of William Shakespeare laid the blueprint for the modern-day soap opera and that’s very believable as all of the Bard’s tragedies tend to follow certain patterns and contain similar themes prevalent in that genre of entertainment.  You have protagonists with fatal flaws, warring families, backstabbing (sometimes in a very literal sense), betrayal, intrigue, alliance, and complex schemes, just to name a few.  Great elements for an engaging spectacle, but BlueBarn’s King Lear has an x factor that raises it to another level.

It’s a masterpiece.

Believe me, I don’t bandy that word about very readily.  But this show is virtually perfect.  Direction that is spot on.  Acting that held nary a flaw.  Beautiful costumes.  Atmospheric lighting.  A transcendent set.  And a story that will have you heart aching at the folly and depravity of man.

I’d known of Jill Anderson’s sterling reputation as an actress, but she proved that she is equally golden as a director.  Anderson truly understands the complexities of Shakespeare’s writing and language and easily guides the audience through its labyrinthian path.  She knew when to punch up a moment with just the right amount of big emotion and when the subtlest of subtlety was needed.  The pacing was sure.  The staging was immaculate.  Anderson’s grip on the language was so ironclad that she had an entire cast tossing it off as if it were their natural tongue.  Her coaching of the actors was championship quality as they worked like a well-oiled machine with hardly a blip in their work.

 I could easily wax poetic on the work of the entire cast, but for brevity’s sake, let me simply say that some of the truly excellent performances you’ll see come from Josh Peyton who shines in my favorite role of The Fool, who just may be the wisest person in the show.  Matthew Kisher is stellar as Edgar, a good and innocent man who is compelled to accept the heavy mantle of avenger and hero when he finds himself and his father the target of a conspiracy.  Ashley Kobza and Melissa King kill it as Goneril and Regan.  Kobza is particularly impressive as the brutish, more military minded Goneril while King’s Regan is a bit more Machiavellian, yet is capable of a frightening level of viciousness as when she claws out the eye of an ally of her father, Lear.  Delaney Jackson is haunting as the gentle Cordelia who is disinherited by Lear simply because she is sincere about her love for him.

I’ve seen Thomas Becker essay many a fine role over the years, but his King Lear might just be his crowning achievement (pardon the pun).  This is a very difficult role to perform as the actor needs to play a man who is both strong and weak.  Lear is very much the warrior king, yet is cursed with the fatal flaws of arrogance, stupidity, and ability to be easily manipulated due to his ego.  Becker is incredible as a ruler whose age and ego make him quite irascible, but whose behavior may also indicate the onset of dementia and certainly madness as his eldest daughters break his spirit after they get his land which is all they wanted from him.

Becker makes massive emotional changes on the turn of a dime as he can go from being explosively angry to childishly humorous in the blink of an eye.  Some of Becker’s best scenes are his moments of clarity when he realizes what he has done to himself and to the daughter that truly loved him and you see a glimpse of the good man who got lost somewhere along the way.

Shane Staiger is evil personified as Edmund.  While one can have sympathy at his inability to inherit his father’s lands due to his illegitimate status, his plan to bypass that is reprehensible.  This is truly one of the most selfish people I’ve seen portrayed on stage and Staiger is phenomenal.  In the presence of others, he assumes a gentlemanly and honorable persona, but removes that mask in his monologues where his derisive sneers and demonic smirks fully make you buy into his evil.  This man truly looks out for number one and he will lie to, kill, and seduce whomever he has to in order to obtain the power he desperately craves.

Ryan Kathman is a truly noble man as Kent.  This is a man who truly loves his king and because of that love can’t be anything less than honest with him.  Kathman’s Kent boldly and bluntly tells the king when he does wrong even when that directness results in his exile.  Yet so great is his love that he continues to serve his king in disguise in order to protect him from himself.  Not only does Kathman project that needed sense of decency and loyalty, he also shows some dandy comedic chops with his hilarious abuse of the servant, Oswald.

Steven Williams’ set transports you back to a long-ago time with its wooden outline shaping into elegant castle doors and staircases as frilled sheets decorate the ceiling and descend into tapestries.  His lighting is so atmospheric especially during the monologue scenes when the lights go low except for a lone light on the speaker with the color matching the speaker’s personality such as the sadistic red of Edmund’s speeches.  His lighting for the storm sequence combined with Bill Kirby’s booming thunder made for one of the best technical scenes I’ve ever seen on stage.  And speaking of sounds, Kirby’s are top notch from the relentless drumbeats that drive the story to its finale to the definitive thump of a drawbridge closing, effectively imprisoning Gloucester in his own home.  Jill Anderson did double duty as she was also costume designer and they are dynamite with their medieval look from the knights to the Fool’s jester outfit to the elegant dresses of the ladies and the robes of the men.

This is an extremely worthy night of entertainment and don’t be concerned that you might not understand the classical language.  The program contains a synopsis of the story so you’ll understand what’s going on and then can merely immerse yourself in the language, acting, and tragic story of a land’s downfall due to a foolish king.

King Lear runs at BlueBarn through April 16.  Showtimes are Thurs-Sat at 7:30pm with a performance on April 3 at 2pm and April 10 at 6pm. Tickets cost $35 and can be purchased by calling 402-345-1576 or visiting www.bluebarn.org. BlueBarn Theatre is located at 1106 S 10th St in Omaha, NE.

You’ll ‘Die Hard’ Laughing

A hard-edged NYC police officer flies out to Los Angeles to spend Christmas with his estranged wife and family, but gets caught up in a massive robbery attempt and he’s the only hope to stop the thieves.  Hey, this might make for a good movie!  But it’s A Very Die Hard Christmas and it’s currently playing at BlueBarn Theatre.

Jeff Schell and the Habit knew just what notes to strike when they decided to lampoon this classic action flick.  They actually stay true to the story, but completely upend its spirit with a comedic tour de force guaranteed to leave you wheezing for air before the night is through.  The meta aspect of the script is its finest quality as the show is aware it’s a show.  And a show done on the cheap at that as they can’t afford a full contingent of criminals and rely on Nerf ammo and squirt guns to mete out the show’s rampant violence.

Susan Clement dives into the heart of this show with a stylish bit of direction.  The show is immaculately staged as actors flow in and out of scenes as seamlessly as a rolling river.  Clement is able to give each actor a moment to shine and each feels like an individual and not just a piece of the ensemble.  Her coaching is right on the money as each performer gives a well-developed performance.  But keep your eyes on everybody or you might miss some subtle sight gags going on in the background of the crowd scenes.

Each member of the ensemble is a joy to watch and you’ll be treated to some quality work from Jonathan Purcell as Ellis, a coked-up prick who arrogantly thinks he can negotiate his way to safety and has a surprising set of pipes when he sings about how he “doesn’t want to die tonight”.  Roni Shelley-Perez lights it up in overacting, soap operatic glory as McClane’s estranged wife, Holly.  Raydell Cordell III is a scream as a Nakatomi employee who continuously pops up to say, “Oh, snap!” as well as providing a gentle take on Sgt. Al Powell, a police officer who lost some of his heart when he shot a kid.

Katie Becker-Colon might have the best role in the show as the Narrator.  Dolled up like Andy Warhol, Becker-Colon pops up to move the story along with endless variations and styles of Twas the Night Before Christmas while filling in needed gaps for assistance such as playing the piano or serving as a cameraperson for the obsequious reporter hungering for a scoop.  Becker-Colon is also a heck of a hoofer as I was blown away by her crisp dancing in the musical numbers.

Hughston Walkinshaw is magnetic as Hans Gruber, the criminal mastermind.  His performance invokes reminisces of Alan Rickman without aping him.  Walkinshaw is clearly having a ball as he cold-bloodedly squirts people to death, clomps around the stage while monologuing, and occasionally flips characters to Severus Snape for obligatory Harry Potter jokes.

Josh Peyton is a worthy John McClane as he makes the role his own.  He’s a chain-smoking, blue collar cop determined to see justice done regardless of regulations.  Peyton’s physicality is staggering as he deftly moves between building floors to dodge murderous thieves, hangs and shimmies down a bar, and rolls, rolls, rolls his way to justice and cover.  His fistfight with a life sized doll near the end of Act I is easily one of the funniest sight gags I have ever seen on stage.

Melanie Walters’ choreography is a blast to watch.  Robert Donlan’s set provides the feel of a cheaper version of downtown LA with the towering Nakatomi building.  Joshua Mullady’s lights really add some spice to the show with the starlit night sky and the complete drop to darkness before doing a slow light rise for the entrances of the FBI.  Jennifer Pool’s costumes evoke memories of the film from McClane’s dirty T-shirt to the 80s style clothes of the Nakatomi employees. 

It’s fast, furious, and funny and it’s almost sold out.  As of this writing, the only available tickets remaining are for the Dec 8 show at 7:30pm and they’re limited.  So visit www.bluebarn.org or call 402-345-1576 to grab one of the last tickets for this Christmas blockbuster.  Tickets cost $35.

A Very Die Hard Christmas runs through December 19.  Due to profanity, the show is not recommended for young children.  BlueBarn Theatre is located at 1106 S 10th St in Omaha, NE.

Deck the Halls or Die Hard

BLUEBARN THEATRE Proudly Presents:

The Return of Our Holiday Smash Hit

A Very Die Hard Christmas
by Jeff Schell and the Habit

November 26th-December 19th, 2021
Wednesdays-Saturdays at 7:30pm
Sundays: 11/28 at 2pm| 12/5 at 2pm & 6pm | 12/12 & 12/19 at 2pm
No show Thursday 12/2

Forty Floors of Sheer Adventure!

Tickets
General Admission($35) and Educator|Healthcare|Military($30)

Tickets are available at bluebarn.org or through the box office @ (402) 345-1576.

About the Play
The Best. Holiday Show. Ever. Based on the Best. Christmas. Movie. Of All Time. Is. Back! Join us once again at Nakatomi Plaza! It’s John McClane versus Hans Gruber with Christmas itself on the line! Grab your Twinkies, your cocaine, and your favorite explosive device for our star-studded remount of A Very Die Hard Christmas.

About the Production
A Very Die Hard Christmas features Hughston Walkinshaw, Katie Becker-Colón, Theresa Sindelar, Josh Peyton, Jonathan Purcell, Ronnie Shelley-Perez, Diane Watson, Raydell Cordell III, Bill Grennan, Todd Brooks, Kerron Stark, Don Harris, Therese Rennels, J.J. Davis, and Wai Yim. Directed by Susan Clement. Dramaturgy by Barry Carman. Sound Design by Bill Kirby. Properties by Amy Reiner. Set Design by Bob Donlan. Lighting Design by Josh Mullady. Costume Design by Jenny Pool. Choreography by Melanie Walters. Fight Direction by Ezra Colón.

ASL interpreted performance Thursday, Dec. 16th.

BlueBarn Theatre is located at 1106 S 10th St in Omaha, NE.

You Can’t Go Home Again

A group of students from a small Catholic college in Wyoming reunite to celebrate the installation of a beloved professor as the school’s new president.  During their conversations and debates, ugly truths are revealed and raw emotions come to the forefront.  This is Heroes of the Fourth Turning and it is currently playing at BlueBarn Theatre.

Without question, this is one of the deepest plays I’ve ever seen.  Will Arbery has an ironclad grip on the current times and asks a lot of questions in this modern morality play.  These questions have no easy answers and Arbery does not attempt to answer them.  He merely poses the talking points.  Arbery asks questions of the true nature of morality; the raging us vs them mentality of society, especially when it comes to political platforms; why people gravitate towards certain collectives; the inability to have civil discourse with differing opinions; the dangers of pride and ambition carried too far, just to name a few.  That he does it through a quintet of conservative characters is a particularly clever touch and a good way to get people to walk a mile in another’s shoes as the old saying goes.  These powerful questions almost make the audience forget that Arbery leaves a couple of plot threads dangling especially one including a Twilight Zone style twist.

Barry Carman helms this production and his direction is of sterling quality.  Carman cuts a fierce pace for this juggernaut production.  He intimately understands the beats and momentum of this show as it just builds and builds into a runaway train that threatens to derail until finally applying the brakes at the critical juncture.  Carman also has a sense of movement that is second to none.  Each and every time his characters move, there is a clear purpose behind it that speaks as loudly as words.  Carman has also led his cast to remarkable performances.  There isn’t a weak link among them and each performer gets a moment in the spotlight.

As Gina, Joey Hartshorn is the beloved teacher who had a hand in molding the thinking of her 4 students, one of whom is her daughter.  Hartshorn brings a definitive intelligence to the character and a certain open-mindedness in her conservatism.  She’ll always vote the platform out of principle, but chooses to follow leaders that she believes are best for the country such as Barry Goldwater and Pat Buchanan.  She also doesn’t buy into the “gloom and doom” thinking of her protégé who believes that a culture war is brewing.  Hartshorn also brings a certain coldness to her interpretation.   She clearly doesn’t have a good relationship with her daughter and didn’t seem all that interested in seeing her students again.  Not only does she lay into her protégé, Teresa, for not thinking exactly as she does, but she shows some liberal leanings now that she’s running the show at the college.

Suzanne Withem does some exemplary work with her take on Teresa.  As Gina’s protégé, Withem’s Teresa drank copious amounts from her fountain of knowledge and seems to aspire to be a better Gina than Gina.  Teresa is the most conservative of the group and appears to downright hate liberals with her comments about them being evil due to their adherence to the pro-choice platform.  Withem brings an ice-cold selfishness to Teresa who clearly believes herself to be smarter, more moral, and simply better than her classmates.  She’s utterly disdainful of Kevin, backhand compliments Emily, has some respect for Justin, and fawns over Gina.  Gina’s dismissal of her gives Withem the chance to break Teresa’s chilly exterior and show the scared child hiding behind it.

I’ve always been dazzled by Anna Jordan’s mastery of body language and her turn as Emily further bolsters that amazement.  Jordan’s Emily suffers from a nameless disease that leaves her frail and constantly hurting.  With her caved in chest and heavy leaning on her cane, Jordan truly appears haggard and ill.  Emily is the most open-minded of the group and seems to always look for the truth and the good.  It’s hinted that her illness may just be in her head and that she truly suffers from extreme empathy.  You can see Jordan visibly start to break as tensions get higher and higher, triggering flashbacks to a distressing incident with a client which might have been the onset of her own illness.

Thomas Gjere is a truly good man as Justin.  Justin is definitely the rock of this group.  He clearly had a rough past and Gjere makes you believe that he was a hard-edged man who had those edges softened after finding the college and Gina who he says “saved his life”.  Justin is a flawed man and Gjere has subtle guilty expressions when he recalls some of his past troubled life.  He’s on the search for something greater, but whether he is doing so out of personal growth or fear is left for the viewer to decide.

Michael Judah’s Kevin is definitely the most broken character in the show.  Judah does splendid work essaying Kevin’s drunkenness and the truth that almost literally spews from him due to the loosening power of booze.  Kevin seems to pine for perfect morality and emotionally flagellates himself whenever he falls short of it.  This seems to happen frightfully often due to his utter loneliness which appears to be caused by fear of women (he gets physically sick talking about the Virgin Mary) which, in itself, was caused by his repression of love for Teresa and Emily.

Jason Jamerson has designed an extraordinary set that looks like you are genuinely outside in a wooded area with its long grass, trees, bushes, and stumps with the back of Justin’s house butting up against it.  I swear I could almost feel the cool breeze blowing in from a nearby river.  Homero Vela’s lights perfectly emulate a starlit night, but the flip side of being true to the setting meant the faint light made it hard to see the actors’ faces and expressions when they were in darker parts of the stage.  That leads to an interesting conundrum and I’ll be honest in admitting I’m not sure how to get the best of both worlds.  Bill Kirby’s sounds make for an ambient night and, at points, something a little more terrifying and jumpy.  Jocelyn Reed’s costumes helped to flesh out the characters from the business pantsuit of Gina to the outdoorsy clothes of Justin, the hoodie of the frail Emily, the stiff, professional clothes of Kevin, and the practical clothes of Teresa.

Buckle yourself in for a challenging night of theatre, but there is a powerful kernel of hope in this show in that it may encourage people to talk to each other instead of at each other.

Heroes of the Fourth Turning runs at BlueBarn Theatre through October 24.  Showtimes are Thurs-Sat at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2pm with the exception of a 6pm show on October 17.  Tickets cost $35 and can be purchased by calling 402-345-1576 or visiting www.bluebarn.org.  Due to mature themes and language, this show is not suitable for children.  BlueBarn Theatre is located at 1106 S 10th St in Omaha, NE.

BlueBarn Theatre Holding Auditions for Regional Premiere, ‘Buffalo Women’

BLUEBARN is proud to announce open auditions for the regional premiere of:

Buffalo Women
by Beaufield Berry with Music and Additional Lyrics by J. Isaiah Smith

Directed by Nik Whitcomb

Music Direction by Justin Payne

Saturday October 2nd, 2021: 1pm-4pm
BLUEBARN Theatre, 1106 S. 10th St

Tentative Workshop Dates: January 16th – January 22nd
Rehearsal Dates: April 24th – May 25th
Production Dates: May 26th – June 19th
Compensation: $2,000

For more information, visit bluebarn.org/auditions.

To schedule an audition, contact Chris at: chernandez@bluebarn.org

**All artists working at the BLUEBARN are required to have been vaccinated for COVID-19**

Company members needed:

CATHAY (30s-50s): Alto. Cathay is soft spoken and wise. A lot happens internally before she says anything externally. “Keeping my head down kept me alive.” Cathay is the trained soldier of the group. She knows how to attack and when. And always two steps ahead of their enemies. True historical figure.

BIDDY (30s-60s): Soprano. No-nonsense, intellectual, calculated. Biddy is a natural businesswoman…with big dreams and a rap number. Biddy has been on this type of journey with her own children, she’s the mama, the guider, the financial planner. She’s the Oprah. Hahahaha. True Historical figure.

STAGECOACH MARY (40s-70s): Contralto. Stagecoach is a fearless, cigar smoking, whiskey drinking, rifle carrying, mail carrying bad mamma jamma. She’s Bethulah with experience. True Historical Figure. Mary’s songs range from sexy ballads to high-stepping country.

PLAYWRIGHT (37): The playwright serves as the narrator, the dreamer, the snake, the historian, and the roadmap. Stepping in where context or a new element is needed, the playwright is omnipresent -past, present and future.

The roles of Bethulah and Zadie have already been cast.

EMBRACE Blue Barn’s 33rd Season

BLUEBARN Theatre is proud to announce Season 33: EMBRACE.

After so much separation and isolation, we are thrilled to welcome you back to a full season of transformative live theatre. Season 33 embraces the very best of original, contemporary, and classic work, exactly what you’ve come to expect from Omaha’s Premier Professional Theatre. Our new season also fully embraces our commitment to creating a thriving, equitable arts scene in Omaha. Join us in embracing compassion and justice, join us in embracing extraordinary art and the artists who create it, join us in embracing a stronger sense of community.

Returning TRUBLU members can renew their membership today. Check your email for details, or call the box office at (402) 345-1576.

Public sales begin August 16 – visit bluebarn.org/plays-events for details!

Season 33 – Mainstage

Embrace Empathy

Heroes of the Fourth Turning by Will Arbery
September 30th – October 24th

Embrace Explosive Laughter

A Very Die Hard Christmas by Jeff Schell and the Habit
November 26th – December 19th

Embrace Madness and Love

King Lear by William Shakespeare
March 24th – April 17th

Embrace the Wild West

Buffalo Women: A Black Cowgirl Musical Dramedy by Beaufield Berry Music and Additional Lyrics by J. Isaiah Smith
May 26th – June 19th

Season 33 – Happenings

Embrace Emerging Artists

The BIG DAMN DOOR Festival: BONFIRE Residencies

Embrace the Future

R. Buckminster Fuller: THE HISTORY (and Mystery) OF THE UNIVERSE A play by D.W. Jacobs
Based on the life and writings of R. Buckminster Fuller
Six Drop-in Experiences throughout the Season

Embrace the Power of Storytelling

Musing: A Storytelling Series
Gatherings Quarterly, beginning Oct 13th

Blue Barn Recruiting for 33rd Season Premiere

Blue Barn Theatre Announces Auditions for:

Heroes of the Fourth Turning by Will Arbery

July 31st & August 1st, 2021: 2pm-6pm
*callbacks, if necessary: August 8th from 12-4pm
Location: 1106 S 10th St, Omaha, NE

Time Commitment: 8 weeks
Rehearsal Dates: August 30th – September 29th  
Production Dates: September 30th – October 24th
Compensation: $2,500

Company Members Needed
JUSTIN (38): ex-military, plays guitar, writes stories
EMILY (25): empathic, walks with a cane, appears to suffer from Lyme disease
KEVIN (28): drunk mostly, recites poetry, pines
THERESA (29): ambitious, coke-fueled, writes a neo-conservative blog
GINA (64): professor, Goldwater Girl, mentor or mother to the others


Auditions will consist of prepared sides, and cold readings from the script. Prepared monologues under 2 minutes are welcome, though not required. To request a copy of the script, sides, or to schedule an audition contact Barry at: bcarman@bluebarn.org                   
 ***All artists working at the BLUEBARN are required to have been vaccinated for COVID-19***

Casting Statement of Principle: BLUEBARN Theatre acknowledges the historic exclusion and lack of opportunity for artists who identify as Global Majority (Black, Indigenous, and people of color), LGBTQIA2S+, neuro-diverse, and artists with disabilities. We are committed to identity-conscious casting, and actively working against the field-wide implicit bias and systemic inequities that result in default white, cis, heteronormative casting. BLUEBARN is likewise committed to countering ableism, ageism, sexism, sizeism, lookism and other modes of discrimination in casting that continue to create barriers to participation in the theatre.  
    
Casting Notes Specific to Heroes of the Fourth Turning: BLUEBARN encourages actors of all identities to audition, with the following caveat: this play is, in part, about Whiteness and the way it operates in America. Each character is implicated. When considering actors who identify otherwise, an openness to investigate ‘passing’, ‘assimilation’, ‘adoption’, ‘erasure’, etc. is required in approaching these characters. Both the creative team and interested actors should enter the process with intentionality with regards to that responsibility. Actors from their early 20s to early 40s are encouraged to audition for Emily, Kevin, Justin, and Theresa. Relative rather than specific ages are sought. Actors from their early 50s to early 70s are encouraged to audition for Gina. 

About Heroes of the Fourth Turning: August 19th, 2017. Two days before the solar eclipse. One weekend after the Charlottesville riots. It’s nearing midnight in Wyoming, where four young conservatives have gathered at a backyard after-party. They’ve returned home to toast their mentor Gina, newly inducted as president of a tiny Catholic college. But as their reunion spirals into spiritual chaos and clashing generational politics, it becomes less a celebration than a vicious fight to be understood. Heroes speaks to the heart of a country at war with itself.

High Risk Element Disclosure: Heroes of the Fourth Turning features physical violence, trauma-inflected character work (particularly Emily), emotional violence, and language and ideas that are potentially harmful to a number of intersecting identities (particularly the TGNC and BIPOC community). BLUEBARN is committed to a creating a community of care around this production with the appropriate professionals and an intentional process to mitigate harm and provide a safe space for this work and the artists engaged in it to thrive. 
For more information, contact Barry Carman at bcarman@bluebarn.org or (402) 345-1576 ext 4

Blue Barn to Mount One Night Only Virtual Performance of ‘Marjorie Prime’

Virtual Tickets are On Sale Now for  Marjorie Prime by Jordan Harrison
Directed by Susan Baer Collins
Featuring: Ablan Roblin, Ben Beck, Julie Huff, Ruth Rath
Virtual Performance One Night Only March 26, 7pm
In the near future, ‘Primes’ are available from the good people at Senior Serenity, the latest devices for helping people with their fading memories and loss of companionship. Marjorie’s daughter and son-in-law have purchased Walter Prime (a holographic projection of her husband as he looked in his 30s) to keep her company. As the Prime is fed memories and conversation, the shape of their lives are revealed, more and more years are covered and recovered, and the nature of memories, the legacy of the past, and the promise of the future are all called into question.   Memories are not the key to the past, but the future.

STREAM Virtual Performance ONE NIGHT ONLY on March 26 at 7pm by clicking here: https://bluebarn.anywhereseat.com/channel.php
Tickets may be purchased in advance
General Admission – $25
Healthcare Workers, Military Personnel, Educators – $20
TRUBLU Members – FREE