Blue Barn Reinvents a Holiday Classic

BLUEBARN THEATRE presents:

The Regional Premiere of

A Very Die Hard Christmas

By Jeff Schell and the Habit

November 29th -December 22nd, 2019

Thursdays-Saturdays at 7:30pm

Wednesday 12/11 & 12/18 at 7:30pm

Sundays: 12/1 at 6pm| 12/8 at 2pm & 6pm | 12/22 at 2pm

Come out to the coast. We’ll have a few laughs.

About the play:  Yippee-Ki-Yay! An outrageous take on the Most. Beloved. Christmas Movie. Of. All Time, we cordially invite you to our company Christmas party at Nakatomi Plaza! All NYPD Blue’s John McClane wants is to come to the coast, get together with his estranged wife, and have some laughs. But when a team of well-choreographed, vaguely European terrorists start taking hostages as part of their nefarious plot to…who cares! John has to cowboy up! Starring the dead guy from The Sixth Sense, the cop outside with Twinkies, big big hair, cocaine, indoor smoking, Professor Snape, and 40 floors of sheer adventure!

About the production: A Very Die Hard Christmas features Hughston Walkinshaw, Katie Becker-Colón, Theresa Sindelar, Josh Peyton, Jonathan Purcell, Diane Watson, Raydell Cordell III, Dave Wingert, Nicole Callahan, Todd Brooks, Kerron Stark, Don Harris, Therese Rennels, Mike Markey, and Wai Yim. Directed by Susan Clement-Toberer. Dramaturgy by Barry Carman. Sound Design by Bill Kirby. Properties by Amy Reiner. Set Design by Bob Donlan. Lighting Design by Josh Mullady. Costume Design by Jenny Pool. Choreography by Melanie Walters. Fight Direction by Ezra Colón

This production is sponsored in part by Omaha Steaks

Tickets: General Admission ($35) and Senior ($30) tickets are available at bluebarn.org. Educator, Military, and BLUCrew tickets are available through the box office (402) 345-1576.

Location:  1106 S 10th St in Omaha, NE

Seasons of Returning to My Roots

“When are we going to see you on stage again?”

You’d be surprised at how often I’ve heard that question recently.

“The next time I audition” is what I would like to say, but, as my regular readers have learned, we actors have very little control over when we get our next role.

“When a role I want intersects with a director seeing me in said role,” might be a little closer to the mark, but I still don’t think it’s the right answer.  It’s also a mouthful to say.

I have the answer, but I’ll wait until the end to reveal it.

It’s been a while since I’ve had enough tales built up to merit writing an entry, but this season and the close of last season have provided some pretty interesting fare.

It began late last season with auditions for One Man, Two Guvnors over at the Omaha Community Playhouse and guest directed by Anthony Clark-Kaczmarek.

This is a modern day rewrite of A Servant of Two Masters and tells the story of Francis Henshall, a minder (British slang for bodyguard), lackey, and all around gofer for two criminals and his desperate shenanigans to prevent the two bosses from ever meeting.

There was only one role I really wanted in this show and that was Alan Dangle, a wannabe actor who is constantly on and a pretty poor performer to boot.  With a lot of Omaha’s finest auditioning for this one, I figured there would be a lot of good playing around at this audition.

While that may have been true, it simply wasn’t going to be true for me.  My instincts were on target.  A sad pity that my execution was not.  The vision in my head did not match the interpretation coming out of my mouth.  I had stumbled getting out of the gate and never managed to regain lost ground.

I didn’t even hold a faint glimmer of hope about this one.  I actually had a weird sense of satisfaction being able to look into a mirror and saying, “Hey, buddy.  That one was all on you” after I got the rejection.  After years of being rejected for reasons other than my prowess, it was almost refreshing to know I was the cause of my own downfall.

Then came this season.  My defeat in One Man, Two Guvnors was a return to my roots in the wrong way albeit an oddly satisfying wrong, but now I was getting back to the right way with the most auditions I had done in quite a long time.

I would begin with the OCP’s season premiere of Sweat which would be guest directed by Susie Baer-Collins.

Sweat is inspired by the story of Reading, Pennsylvania.  This steel mill town went from being one of the most prosperous in the country to one of the poorest due to the Great Recession.  The play focuses on the employees of a steel mill and the bar where they enjoy hanging out.  The steel mill employees are lifers looking towards fat pensions at their retirements.  When the recession strikes, the employees go from looking at lucrative pensions to unemployment.  As things go from bad to worse, tensions rise and racism rears its ugly face until the show’s devastating conclusion.

Now this sounded like a great show.  But I was up against stiff circumstances.  There were only roles for 2 Caucasian actors and I fell right in between their ages.  The younger one was completely out of the question.  Even with my unusually youthful features, my hair and hairline were going to put me out of the running.  However, I hoped they might prove helpful in playing the older man who was suggested to be in his fifties, but I was hoping that maybe he could be bought as a man in his mid to late 40s at a push.

That idea was quickly blasted when I read the line that stated he had been on the floor for 28 years before an injury ended his mill career.  I still had fun with the read as it was a different character from my real personality:  rougher and coarser.  I think I even stunned Susie a bit with my take as she looked at me with a surprised look in her eyes as she walked me out of the room and said, “Good job!” with a bit of wonderment in her voice.

To no shock at all, I wasn’t cast.

Next on my list was the Blue Barn Christmas show, A Very Die Hard Christmas which would mark my first audition with the theatre and Susan Clement-Toberer in five years.

Believe it or not, I have never seen Die Hard in its entirety, though I have seen enough of it to know the story.  Not that it mattered because the character I wanted to play was original to the script and that was the Narrator.

Imagine a role where you just rattle off variations of Twas the Night Before Christmas, sing at inappropriate moments, and just react to the lunacy going on around you while being somewhat separate from it.  This would be a role of great fun.

Even better, the Blue Barn was planning something a bit different this time.  Not only did they want you to sign up for an audition time, but they were encouraging actors to bring monologues.  At last!!  The moment for which I had been waiting.

I’ve long kept a secret weapon for just this opportunity.  A monologue from one of my favorite plays that’s guaranteed to make any director who knows me see me in a brand new way.  To make sure the monologue would be in top form, I revealed the weapon to my friend and ace director, Lara Marsh, who spent an afternoon helping me to polish and refine it.  I was even amazed by the new discoveries made during the process.

The day of the audition arrived and I was practically bursting with excitement though I kept a cool exterior.  I arrived in plenty of time for my 3pm audition which allowed me to engage in some small talk with friends and acquaintances and then the auditions started.  Though I had been expecting to read at 3pm, I didn’t actually get to read until 4:10pm.  But the extra time gave me an opportunity to run through my monologue again and center myself.

When I was on deck to audition, I was handed a side for the Narrator by Blue Barn’s dramaturg, Barry Carman.  I was surprised as I thought they wanted monologues.  But I figured I’d be asked about it once I got inside.

I entered the theatre and met a group consisting of Susan, Susie Baer-Collins, Barry, and Hughston Walkinshaw who would be playing the role of Hans Gruber in the play.  I nailed the read to the floor, managing to infuse a bit of my sheepish humor into the character.  Susan said, “That was really awesome, Chris (pause as she thinks for a moment).  I may or may not be having callbacks for this one.  But you know how things run here and you know I know you” before thanking me for coming.  For a brief moment, I thought I should ask if she would like to hear the monologue, but I pushed it aside, deciding that the idea must have been scrapped.  I was happy with my read and thought I had a good chance based on its strength.

In hindsight, I wish I had obeyed my instinct.

That Friday, I had a thoroughly wretched day.  I mean it was foul!  When I got home, I started to open my mailbox and stopped.  I just had this terrible notion that my day was about to end on an awfully sour note.  I told God that I feared my rejection was in there and asked if it were possible to please hold off for one day if I was rejected just so I could end the day somewhat easier in mind.

I opened the mailbox and saw one letter.  I grabbed it and slowly turned it to face me to see the Blue Barn stationery.

I exhaled a mighty sigh.  I really didn’t want to open the envelope, but did in the faint hopes that maybe it would be a personalized rejection to help cushion the blow.  It wasn’t.

“That’s it.  I’m going to bed,” I thought to myself.

I admit it.  This one got to me.  I really wanted to be part of this project and thought I had a good chance of being involved and the rapidity of my defeat got me in the breadbasket.  As I laid down on my bed, I wondered what might have happened had I brought up the monologue.  Getting to perform it may not have altered the result.  Heck, I may not have even been permitted to read it. But, in either case, at least I would have known that I had my biggest and best bite at the apple as dictated by the circumstances.  On the plus side, I do have it in my back pocket for the future.

My next audition (more than likely, my last of the season) was a real return to my roots.  It marked my first audition for the Brigit St Brigit Theatre Company in. . .I couldn’t tell you how long.  It also marked my first audition for Scott Kurz since he originally read me for Dracula all the way back in 2003.

BSB’s holiday show was going to be a night of one acts capped with an original version of The Monsters are Due on Maple Street which was being reimagined by Scott.  I was looking forward to this one as I’m a big fan of the works of Rod Serling and The Twilight Zone.

My audition night came and I was up for the game and feeling good.  I shook Scott’s hand and began filling out the audition form.  As I scanned the top, I did a double take.  I looked away and blinked.  Then I looked at the form again.

According to the website the show was supposed to end on December 15, but the form said the last day was going to be Dec 22.  I asked Scott if the dates had been changed.  He said there had been an issue scheduling the show with the venue holding it and it had to be pushed back a week.  Internally, I crumbled.  I had to sheepishly admit that I had to fly out to Phoenix at 8am on Dec 22.  Scott seemed just as bummed as I felt.  I offered to stay as an extra body so Scott could have another reader and he thought that was a good idea.

With no stakes to speak of, my reads lacked the full power of my heart.  Not to say they were bad.  On the contrary, technically I was solid.  There were a few characters that didn’t feel quite right, but I loved my takes on Tommy who I reimagined as an autistic man and as the mysterious boss figure to whom I gave a quiet malevolence and a slight edge of insanity.

Scott had said he’d send e-mails out by the end of the week, but it ended up being two weeks later.  A lot had changed in that interim as Scott had informed us that The Twilight Zone was experiencing another burst in popularity and ten classic episodes were being released to the big screen in November, one of which was “Monsters”.  As such, CBS would not release performance rights.

Scott spent that two weeks searching for a new show and found it, but wanted to ask if actors still wanted to be part of it.  Due to my inescapable conflict, I formally took myself out of the running though I suspect my conflict had outed me anyway.

And so my season has come to an end.  It didn’t quite work out the way I planned, but it did open the doors to pleasurable non-theatre activities that would not have been possible had I been doing one of the Christmas shows.  And, of course, it raises the question:

“When are we going to see you on stage again?”

When the time is right.

Join the “Native Gardens” Party

Native Gardens
Written by Karen Zacarías

LocationOmaha Community Playhouse (6915 Cass St, Omaha, NE)

Those auditioning should enter through the west “Stage Door” entrance and proceed to the check-in table downstairs.

Show Dates: Feb. 14 – March 15, 2020 | Howard Drew Theatre

Director: Ablan Roblin

Rehearsals: Begin approximately early January 2020

Description:
When Pablo and Tania purchase a new home in a well-to-do white neighborhood, the couple next door initially offer a friendly welcome. But when a laughable property line disagreement dissolves into an all-out turf war, the dirt begins to fly. Packed with witty quips—and plenty of back-and-forth mudslinging—Native Gardens is a side-splitting reminder that, despite our differences, we all share a much larger common ground.
—–
Roles available:
Tania Del Valle 25-35
Latina. A pregnant doctoral candidate who is determined, bright, energetic, and naturally optimistic. Wants to coexist with the neighbors but she is fiercely protective of her ideas and values.
Ethnicity: Latino / Hispanic

Pablo Del Valle 25-35
Latino. An ambitious and successful attorney who is smart, argumentative, generally tolerant, and willing to overlook a lot until he is pushed over the edge.
Ethnicity: Latino / Hispanic

Virginia Butley 55-65
Caucasian. The breadwinner. Friendly and civil. Smiles a lot, but her opinions are well ingrained and she will fight ruthlessly to protect her turf.
Ethnicity: Caucasian / European Descent

Frank Butley 55-70
Caucasian. A gentle and sensitive soul from New England who has devoted himself to his pristine English garden in his retirement. Wants to get along with the neighbors but cannot embrace a native garden next door. Becomes indignant easily.
Ethnicity: Caucasian / European Descent
—–
Those auditioning will be asked to read from the script provided at auditions.

All contact information, personal schedules, and a list of rehearsal conflicts with which to fill out an audition form should be brought to the theatre.

To expedite the check-in process – please bring a recent photo if you have one available. Please note, photos will not be returned.

Creatures of the Night

Rocky_5

Benn Sieff as Dr. Frank ‘N’ Furter

Newly engaged Brad and Janet have a vehicle breakdown in the middle of nowhere.  They stop at the home of Dr. Frank ‘N’ Furter to seek assistance and find that the good doctor has created a new. . .playmate.  This is The Rocky Horror Show with book, music, and lyrics by Richard O’Brien and is currently playing at the Omaha Community Playhouse.

If you’re unfamiliar with the show, it is an homage to cheesy sci-fi films of the 1950s, but with a lot of raunchiness thrown in.  There’s risqué behavior, performers in various states of undress, and a bit of fondling.  So for those uncomfortable with that, consider yourselves forewarned.

I was pretty much a newbie to this show.  I kind of, sort of watched most of the film version once upon a time, but wasn’t paying that close of attention to it.  After watching the stage version, I can honestly say this show is one of the best in the history of the Playhouse.  It is a tremendous amount of fun with catchy songs (brilliantly executed by Jennifer Novak Haar and her band), an intentionally hokey story, some spritely and original choreography, and a great opportunity for audience participation as they are encouraged to bring noisemakers, rubber gloves, toast, flashlights, and even dress up in costume.

Kaitlyn McClincy directs her first full production at the Playhouse with this endeavor.  This is not an easy show to direct due to the colossal amounts of energy required and the suggestive behavior actors need to be led through.  As my friend succinctly stated, “If you ain’t committed, you’re screwed”.  I assure you McClincy and her cast are most thoroughly committed and McClincy’s direction is immaculate and dead on target.

The staging is incredible with Matthew Hamel creating an old-fashioned movie theater for this show to take place.  McClincy makes phenomenal use of the small Howard Drew as she utilizes the entire theatre from stage to seating area to balcony for her actors to tell this story.  She hits all of the hot points of the show to milk the funny and even drilled the rare sentimental moments of the show.  McClincy also has boldly and deftly led her cast to sterling performances from top to bottom.

As I previously stated, energy is crucial to this show and the ensemble hits the ground running and never lets up in a supercharged night of singing and dancing.  Some standout performances came from Jason DeLong who gives an innocent performance as Rocky, Frank ‘N’ Furter’s new creation and shows an impressive set of pipes in “The Sword of Damocles”; Erika Hall-Sieff does well as the sultry domestic, Magenta, and also gets to let her own rich alto shine in “Science Fiction”; Olivia Howard has one of the night’s funniest moments as Columbia with a series of gyrations and movements after having her brain zapped by Frank; and Kevin Buswell is eerily mysterious as the enigmatic butler Riff Raff.

Benn Sieff comes out roaring in his Playhouse debut as Dr. Frank ‘N’ Furter.  Sieff has incredible instincts and nails the oversexed, over the top mad scientist to the floor.  Sieff has wonderful timing, knowing how to precisely punch a funny line and has a flair for physical comedy, best demonstrated by his bedroom romps with Brad and Janet and he does it all while wearing lingerie and fishnets and gliding around the stage in lifts that add a good six inches to his already towering presence.

Sieff also has a smooth baritone with which he nails comedy in the doctor’s introduction number “Sweet Transvestite” or downright sad and melancholy in one of the night’s few serious moments in “I’m Going Home”.

Cale Albracht is delightfully dorky as Brad.  Albracht’s Brad is a real square and he adds a wonderful stilted and stiff delivery to his lines to emulate the poor actors of cheapo sci-fi films.  Albracht is also a nimble dancer and has a great tenor used to superior effect in “Damn it, Janet” and “Once in a While”.

Charlotte Hedican is sweet and a bit repressed as Janet.  Hedican skillfully handles her hokey dialogue with perfectly sincere camp delivery.  She is also on the mark with the flip from the virginal Janet to the shark smelling blood version after being deflowered by Frank and wants more in “Touch A Touch Me”, one of the top numbers of the evening.

Tim Burkhart and John Gibilisco supply some fantastic sounds from the zap of laser guns to the sounds of storms and the electronic whine of viewscreens.  Amanda Fehlner’s costumes were on target with the tuxedoes of the Transylvanians, the lingerie and fishnets of Frank (and eventually other characters), Rocky’s form fitting golden tights, and the goody-goody look of Janet’s pink dress and Brad’s dark suit.  Courtney Cairncross provides a dazzling bit of choreography especially with the energetic “Time Warp” and the ensemble dancing in “Touch A Touch Me”.

There seemed to be some microphone difficulties at a few points and some of the actors needed to project a bit more strongly.  That being said, I also want to salute the cast for great poise under pressure by not allowing themselves to get thrown off course when a group of theatregoers began to get a bit disruptive halfway through the second act.

It’s cheesy.  It’s hokey.  It’s just plain silly.  But, heavens, this show is fantastic fun and definitely a treat for the Halloween season over at the Playhouse.  Grab your tickets while you can because I foresee many a sellout for this one.

The Rocky Horror Show plays at the Omaha Community Playhouse through Nov 10.  Showtimes are Thurs-Sat at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2pm.  Special midnight showings will take place on Oct 19, Oct 26, and Nov 2 with no Sunday show on the following day.  Ticket prices start at $42 for adults and $25 for students at can be obtained at the OCP box office, by phone at 402-553-0800, or online at www.omahaplayhouse.com.  Due to mature content, this show is not suitable for children.  The Omaha Playhouse is located at 6915 Cass Street in Omaha, NE.

Photo provided by Colin Conces Photography

OCP Set to Do the Time Warp with ‘The Rocky Horror Show’

Rocky_5

Benn Sieff as Dr. Frank ‘N’ Furter

Omaha, NE–Cult classic The Rocky Horror Show will make its long-awaited return to the Omaha Community Playhouse when it opens on Friday, Oct 4, 2019.  The show will run in the Howard Drew Theatre from Oct 4-Nov 10.  Special midnight showings will be held on Oct 19, 26, and Nov 2.  No performances will be held on Oct 20, 27, and Nov 3.

After a flat tire renders them helpless in a storm, Brad and his fiancee, Janet, take refuge in the mansion of Dr. Frank ‘N’ Furter, a dangerously eccentric cross-dressing scientist with an insatiable libido.  As the night unfolds, a host of wild characters plunge in and out of rock songs and elaborate dances, stripping the couple of their innocence and leading them to question their traditional stance on sexuality.  This gender-bending musical extravaganza is the most fun you can have in fishnets!  Audience participation and costumes are encouraged.

Tickets are on sale now starting at $42 for adults and $25 for students with prices varying by performance.  Tickets can be purchased at the OCP Box Office, located at 6915 Cass Street, by phone at 402-553-0800 or online at www.omahaplayhouse.com.

Directed by:  Kaitlyn McClincy

Cast

Benn Sieff as Dr. Frank ‘N’ Furter

Bob Gilmore as Eddie

Cale Albracht as Brad

Charlotte Hedican as Janet

Erika Hall-Sieff as Magenta

Jason Delong as Rocky

Jerry Van Horn as Dr. Scott

Kevin Buswell as Riff Raff

Olivia Howard as Columbia

Rob Baker as Narrator

The Transylvanians will be played by Colin Burk, Connor Meuret, Ejanae Hume, Erin Florea, Evelyn Hill, Jesse White, Jessie Kellerman, Julianna Cooper, Lacey Kiefer, Liliana McMahon, Nathaniel Belshan, Nina Washington, Nora Shelton, Raymond Butler, Riley Perez, and Tonya Stoakes

Photo provided by Colin Conces Photography

Blue Barn Announces Auditions for Season 31: Memory

BLUEBARN THEATRE is pleased to announce auditions for Season 31: Memory

Auditions for A Very Die Hard Christmas and Marjorie Prime

Sunday, September 8th from 3-6pm & Monday, September 9th from 5:30-8:30pm

Company Members Needed:

The Die Hard company is comprised of fourteen actors, many of whom play multiple roles throughout. All ethnicities, genders, and ages are welcome to audition.  For the Sgt. Al Powell track, we are seeking an African-American (late 20s-40s), for the Joseph Takagi track, we are seeking an Asian-American (30s-40s), all other available roles will be cast without restrictions.  A full casting breakdown is available upon request, but due to the nature of the show is subject to change. The roles of Hans Gruber and John McClane have been cast.

For Marjorie Prime, we are seeking to cast Marjorie (60s-80s), Walter (30s), Tess and John (mid-40s-50s, Marjorie’s daughter and son-in-law). All ethnicities and genders welcome.

Preparation:

Actors are encouraged (but not required) to present a contemporary monologue no longer than 90 seconds. Auditions will also include cold readings from the script, and prepared sides (for Marjorie Prime). Sides will be available 8/21.

A Very Die Hard Christmas runs Nov 29th – Dec 22nd, 2019. Rehearsals begin Oct 22nd.

Marjorie Prime runs March 19th – April 12th, 2020. Rehearsals begin Feb 10th

For more information, to request a script or to sign up for auditions or the workshops below, please contact Barry: bcarman@bluebarn.org. When signing up, please indicate which show(s) you’re auditioning for.   

A Chorus Line Dance Workshops

Saturday, October 19th from 10-12pm & Monday, November 11th from 6-8pm 

These workshops are being offered to any actor-dancer interested in auditioning for our production of A Chorus Line. Participants will learn two combinations in contrasting styles at each session, with different combinations taught at each workshop. Please wear comfortable clothing and appropriate footwear. Participation in these workshops is strongly encouraged, but not required for casting consideration for A Chorus Line.  RSVP to bcarman@bluebarn.org.

A Chorus Line Auditions:

Sunday, January 5th from 3pm-6pm & Monday, Jan 6th from 6-9pm.

Further information on our January auditions will be available on December 4th.

A Chorus Line runs May 14th through June 14th, 2020. Rehearsals begin April 13th.

 

Lofte Community Theatre Holding Auditions for “Of Mice and Men” and “The 39 Steps”

The Lofte Community Theatre presents
“Of Mice and Men”  & “The 39 Steps” Auditions

Auditions: July 21 & 22 @ 7:00 PM–Of Mice and Men

Auditions:  July 29 & 30 @ 7:00PM–The 39 Steps

Location:  15841 Manley Road in Manley, NE

Performances: September 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 14, 15
Thursday – Saturday 7:00 pm
Sunday 2:00 pm

Whether you’re new to the stage or an experienced performer, the Lofte Community Theatre welcomes everyone to audition for our productions! Please come a few minutes early to auditions with possible rehearsal and performance conflicts and be prepared to read lines.

Of Mice and Men

Based on the classic novella written by John Steinbeck, this outstanding drama tells the tale of two great friends and their struggle to live the American dream. George and Lennie have been traveling together for years, working hard to save enough for a place of their own. The two are polar opposites but care deeply about each other. When they are hired to a new job trouble begins to brew when one of the bosses’ wife becomes too interested in the infatuated Lennie…Tragic yet beautiful, Of Mice and Men is a staple of American theatre.

This is our Director’s Choice production. The play contains strong language. We suggest PG 13.

The 39 Steps

Mix a Hitchcock masterpiece with a juicy spy novel, add a dash of Monty Python and you have The 39 Steps, a fast-paced whodunit for anyone who loves the magic of theatre! This two-time Tony® Award-winning treat is packed with nonstop laughs, over 150 zany characters (played by a cast of four), an onstage plane crash, handcuffs, missing fingers, and some good old-fashioned romance!

For questions regarding auditions contact the Lofte Community Theatre at 402-234-2553, email director Kevin Colbert at loftedirector@lofte.com, or visit The Lofte Community Theatre’s website at www.Lofte.org and click on “Get Involved”.