‘Ladies’ Leave ‘Em Laughing in the Aisles

Meet Leo Cark and Jack Gable.  They are 2 struggling Shakespearian actors of dubious talent and meager means.  When they stumble onto a chance to steal 2/3 of a multimillion dollar fortune by posing as the long lost relatives of a dying woman, they throw caution to the wind and put their acting skills to the test.  And it is a mighty difficult test as the missing relatives happen to be women.  This is Leading Ladies by Ken Ludwig and currently playing at Maples Repertory Theatre.

A big part of the magic of theatre is that if you change a few elements of a production it becomes brand new all over again.  Just a few months ago I reviewed this show for the Omaha Community Playhouse.  With that performance still fresh in my memory, I got to see an exciting, rib tickling new take on it due to a simple change of director and cast and crew.  This is why one can see the same show over and over and over again and it is still something unique and original.

Brandon McShaffrey truly knows what makes for good farce.  His direction of tonight’s show was genius as he not only knew where and when to add the ludicrous elements, but he also managed to add a sizable amount of realism to the production.  His actors were honest to goodness people as opposed to caricature and he led the lot of them to sterling performances that left the audience rolling in the aisles.

This show is truly an ensemble piece with every actor getting a chance to shine.  Madeline Thomas is simply cute as a button and deliriously ditzy as Audrey.  She may not be too bright, but she’s building her brain one complex word at a time.  Todd Davison and Sean Powell make for a great father/son act as the talentless physician, Doc Myers, and his nerdy, willowy son, Butch.  Andy Brown provides some laughs as Rev. Duncan Wooley, the cheapskate, milquetoast fiancée of the play’s leading lady.  But watch out for Jonna Wiseman as barbed tongued Aunt Florence as she steals every scene she’s in with her acidic antics.

With the supporting cast providing such a strong foundation, it would be nearly impossible for this show to fail and it gets a further boost from its three leads, Michael McIntire, Sean Riley, and Kara Overlien, who admirably carry the bulk of the show on their formidably talented shoulders.

I was extraordinarily impressed with Kara Overlien’s portrayal of Meg.  Ms Overlien is just so. . .genuine as the young heiress.  She plays Meg as a decent woman with a strong streak of integrity as she plans to marry Rev. Wooley for taking care of her after the death of her parents.  But she also gets a lot of joy out of life.  She has passion for the theatre and has a surprising amount of potential as a performer.  She loves music and is a skilled dancer.  In fact, her solo dance number to a radio song is one of the best moments of the night.  Ms Overlien also has incredible facial animation as her reactions to the events swirling about her were always extemporaneous and spot-on.

Sean Riley does so much with so little in his interpretation of Jack Gable.  A slight grin here and a little gesture there had the crowd eating out of Riley’s hand.  Riley’s Gable may be the less talented member of the acting duo, but he might be the mentally swifter of the two.  Riley comes up with absurd sign language as the deaf and dumb “Stephanie” and also knows how to sneak hugs out of Audrey.  He’s also got a bit of the devil in him as he makes Leo’s wooing of Meg more difficult with his insinuations about why we never seem to see Leo and “Maxine” together as well as messing with Leo during their performance at the Moose Lodge.  Riley clearly had a ball with the role and it showed with a stellar performance.

I don’t think I’ve ever seen such a skilled blending of over the topness and realism as the one provided by Michael McIntire’s rendition of Leo Clark.  McIntire’s Clark is truly a good actor, but can’t seem to catch a break.  When he hatches the plan of stealing the fortune he throws, and I mean THROWS, himself in the role of “Maxine”.  McIntire is larger than life as Clark playing Maxine and he dazzlingly moves between the over the top “Maxine” to the natural Leo without missing a beat.  His howlingly funny reactions and expression asides to the audience only further fueled his dynamic performance.

Outstanding technical elements further helped create the world of this show including Charles Johnson’s set which creates the illusion of a well to do home without being ostentatious.  Jack Smith’s costumes were snappy and elegant from the suits and tuxes for the men and the gowns and dresses for the ladies and the “leading ladies”.

Tighter cue pickups and a faster pace would have further bolstered tonight’s production, but it is still one terrific night of comedy.  The best stamp of approval I can give is that this show caused me to laugh myself into a coughing fit at several points and I saw many members of the audience doubled over in hysterics at numerous moments.  But, hey, don’t take our words for it.  Buy a ticket and experience the mirth for yourself.

Leading Ladies plays at Maples Repertory Theatre through July 22.  Showtimes are 7:30pm on July 1, 5, 15, and the 21 and at 2pm on June 24, 28, July 2, 7, 16, 18, 21-22.  Tickets cost $29 for the Main Floor and $22 for the balcony.  For tickets contact the box office at 660-385-2924 or visit the website at www.maplesrep.com.  Maples Repertory Theatre is located at 102 N Rubey St in Macon, MO.

Lead On, “Ladies”

Two broke, out of work Shakespearian actors hatch a plan to steal an inheritance from a wealthy old maid by pretending to be her long lost nieces.  Wrenches start to get thrown into the plan when the two cross dressing con artists fall in love with a pair of women and word comes that the real nieces are on their way.  This is Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies currently playing at the Omaha Community Playhouse.

Ludwig is a masterful writer who knows all the ins and outs of good farce.  You’ve got the slamming doors, the over the top characters, the mistaken identities, and the ludicrous scenarios.  But Ludwig also adds a story that has got quite a bit of heart and includes a couple of surprising plot twists before the tale ends.  His terrific script is supported, nay, enhanced by a sterling cast that runs like a well oiled machine and obtains the maximum amount of yuks possible.

Jeff Horger paints a beautifully funny picture with his direction.  He clearly has an excellent grasp on farce with his use of broad, comedic strokes on the canvas.  Horger’s staging is top notch with his actors constantly moving about the performance space and his sight gags are completely organic and always apropos to the situation.  He’s also led his actors to strong, humorous performances and they made nary a misstep throughout the production.  Horger’s use of a melodramatic score composed and arranged by Vince Krysl is a positively inspired touch.

The supporting cast provides an excellent foundation for the comedy as each has developed a unique, zany character with his or her own particular quirks that brought vivid life to this world.  This includes Catherine Vazquez as a not overly bright waitress who builds a more complex vocabulary one word at a time, Sue Mouttet as the acid tongued matriarch with a heart of gold, and especially Don Harris and Christopher Scott who provided me with some deep belly laughs as the inept and lusty Doc Myers and his dopey son, Butch.

Will Muller stuns with his portrayal of Rev. Duncan Wooley.  With his unyielding posture, monotone voice, and limited, robotic movements, Muller has crafted one of the funniest characters I’ve seen in quite some time.  Muller’s Wooley may be a man of God, but he isn’t very likable as he is a stick in the mud’s stick in the mud who never wants to have any fun, plans a dull, businesslike wedding, and schemes to do God’s work using his fiancée’s wealth.  Muller is at his comedic best when his buttons get pushed to the point where his emotions finally explode out of him.

Victoria Luther is absolutely darling with her interpretation of Meg Snider, Wooley’s fiancée and heiress to a large fortune.  In many ways, Ms Luther is the glue of this cast as her character fuses the play’s unreality to its reality.  She is the most natural character in the show and brings a bright vibrancy with her character’s love of theatre and life.  Ms Luther shows impressive versatility as she easily switches from believable, grounded moments to over the top reactions when the need arises.

As important as the other characters are, the heaviest burden of this show lies on the shoulders of its “leading ladies” and the burden is well and ably carried by Kevin Goshorn and Michael Judah making their Playhouse debuts.

Michael Judah arguably does the most heavy lifting with his rendition of Leo Clark.  Clark is not only a sucky, over the top actor, but he is always on and has a mouth with an inexhaustible energy source.  Judah’s energy is unbelievably phenomenal as he rises to the challenge of this role with a feat of skillful overacting that would make John Carradine proud.  How he maintains that energy without collapsing is beyond me as he easily transitions from the theatrical Clark to the equally over the top “Maxine”.  Yet the over the topness of the character still seems completely natural.  It’s as if Clark doesn’t know how to just be himself until he falls in love with Meg and FINALLY drops his defenses and is able to engage in some lovely softer moments with her.

Kevin Goshorn’s Jack Gable is a worthy sidekick to Leo Clark.  Goshorn marvelously plays the loyal friend who gets caught up in Clark’s machinations.  Forced to impersonate Stephanie, the deaf and dumb niece, Goshorn has stupendous facial expressions and body language as he invents his own sign language to communicate with others and is especially amusing when he uses that sign language to tell “Maxine” he’d like to throttle “her”.  But he’s no shrinking violet.  As decent a person as Gable is, he isn’t above worming hugs out of the lady he likes or standing up to Clark by manipulating him to become “Maxine” just to screw with him.  Goshorn also gets the play’s funniest moment when he tries to bait Wooley into seducing him in order to help Clark get Meg.

The Snider estate, designed by Steve Wheeldon, is absolutely gorgeous with its soft blue walls and fancy double doors.  John Gibilisco’s sounds almost become extra characters with Clark’s idea moments and Meg’s entrance theme.  Amanda Fehlner’s costumes are extremely elegant, especially the gowns worn by Ms Luther, Judah, and Goshorn.  Darin Kuehler’s properties, especially the furniture, really liven up the stage.

This is the type of show that’s sure to take you out of yourself for a little while.  It’s not only laugh out loud funny, but it’s also got just the right touch of warmth and heart.

Leading Ladies runs at the Playhouse through May 7.  Showtimes are Wed-Sat at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2pm.  Tickets are $36 for adults and $22 for students Thurs-Sun.  Wednesday show tickets are $28 for adults and $18 for students.  For tickets, contact the box office at 402-553-0800 or visit www.omahaplayhouse.com or www.ticketomaha.com.  The Omaha Community Playhouse is located at 6915 Cass St in Omaha, NE.

‘Leading Ladies’ is Next on OCP’s Mainstage

Omaha, Neb. – Leading Ladies, running April 14 – May 7, 2017 in the Hawks Mainstage Theatre at Omaha Community Playhouse, is a hilarious comedy by Ken Ludwig.

The story centers around two English Shakespearean actors, Jack and Leo, who find themselves so down on their luck that they are performing “Scenes from Shakespeare” on the Moose Lodge circuit in the Amish country of Pennsylvania. When they hear that an old lady in York, PA is about to die and leave her fortune to her two long-lost English nephews, they resolve to pass themselves off as her beloved relatives and get the cash. The trouble is, when they get to York, they find out that the relatives aren’t nephews, but nieces! Romantic entanglements ensue, especially when Leo falls madly in love with the old lady’s vivacious niece, Meg, who’s engaged to the local minister.

Award-winning playwright Ken Ludwig is known for such comedies as the Tony Award-winning Lend Me a Tenor, the Tony Award-winning Crazy For You, Moon Over Buffalo and Shakespeare in Hollywood. Leading Ladies falls right in line with his other titles, where cross-dressing, impersonating and falling in love lead the way.

Production:        Leading Ladies

Credits:                Book by Ken Ludwig

Director:              Jeff Horger

Cast

Michael Judah as Leo Clark

Kevin Goshorn as Jack Gable

Victoria Luther as Meg Snider

Catherine Vazquez as Audrey

Don Harris as Doc Myers

Sue Mouttet as Florence Snider

Will Muller as Duncan Wooley

Christopher Scott as Butch Myers/Frank

Show Dates:       April 14 – May 7, 2017 (Wednesday – Sat at 7:30pm, Sun at 2pm)

Tickets: At the OCP Box Office at 69th & Cass, by calling (402) 553-0800 or online at www.OmahaPlayhouse.com or www.TicketOmaha.com. Single tickets are $36 for adults and $22 for students (Thursdays – Sundays) and $28 for adults and $18 for students (Wednesdays). Tickets for groups of 12 or more are $24 for adults and $16 for students (Thursdays – Sundays) and $20 for adults and $14 for students (Wednesdays).

Twilight Tickets – A limited number of tickets are available at half price after noon the day of the performance at the Box Office. Cash or check only. Subject to availability.

Wednesday Performances – Discounted tickets are available for Wednesday performances only at $28 for adults and $18 for students

Whatta Deal Wednesday–Discounted tickets for $10 will be available for the first Wednesday performance on April 19, 2017.  $10 tickets will be available in person at the box office starting at 4pm the day of the show.

Sponsored by:   Carter and Vernie Jones

Location:  Omaha Community Playhouse, 6915 Cass St in Omaha, NE

 

 

Do You Want to be a Leading Lady?

Leading Ladies Auditions

Production: Leading Ladies

Auditions: Monday, February 13 at 7:00 p.m. and Tuesday, February 14 at 7:00 p.m. Director: Jeff Horger

Location:  Om

Synopsis: A farce set in the 1950s. When a couple of low-rent English actors hit a low point in their careers, they concoct a scheme to swindle an inheritance out of an old lady in York, Pennsylvania. They are willing to do whatever it takes to close the deal, even if it means posing as her long-lost nieces in the process. A colorful group of supporting characters hinders their progress through counter-schemes, general confusion and even romance.

NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR: Dress comfortably, but not for the part. We have a fabulous costume department that will take care of our wardrobe needs. Right now we’re just looking for actors who can create characters and live in them truthfully. This will be a time for actors to show off their ability to act, not to prove their level of comfort in any particular style of dress. Auditions will include scenes with Leo and Jack dressed both as men and as women, so any type of attire is equally appropriate.

Roles:

Note: Actors of all ethnicities are encouraged to audition

LEO CLARK – (Late-20s to Mid-40s, male) A failed Shakespearean actor in search of fame and fortune. If not the lead actor, he is certainly the stronger presence in Clark and Gable’s two-man theatre troupe. Confident and scheming in his day-to-day life, and no less so when he masquerades as Maxine. The roles of Leo and Jack require solid comedic skills and a strong middle-class British dialect. The role of Leo has a lot of heavy lifting to do in regards to dialect, as it contains the portrayal of an actor of two separate genders both on stage and off.

JACK GABLE – (Mid-20s to Mid-30s, male) Leo’s second banana. A little more naïve than Leo and a lot more nervous about their get-rich-quick scheme. He masquerades as Stephanie, who is deaf and mute. He spends most of the play in a state of either blatant frustration or a concentrated effort to hide his frustration. The roles of Leo and Jack require solid comedic skills and a strong middle-class British dialect.

MEG SNIDER – (Late-20s to Late-30s, female) A local woman with big dreams. She is serious, smart and concerned with the current state of the universe, but she is not aggressive, mean or rash. She is kind, warm and has a great sense of humor – the kind of woman you want to take home to meet your parents.

AUDREY – (Early-20s, female) an extremely sweet, good-natured and very talkative young woman. She is strikingly beautiful, but doesn’t realize it. This role requires roller skating.

DOC MYERS – (Late-40s to Early-60s, male) A local doctor and head of the local Moose Lodge. A likeable curmudgeon who dispenses more smart aleck comments than sage wisdom. Sort of a “salt of the earth” type. He is “as proud as can be expected” of his son Butch.

FLORENCE SNIDER – (Early-60s to Mid-70s) A crotchety old woman with a whole lot of money and very little hearing capability. She has been the matriarch of the family for several decades and is used to being the center of attention, if not the universe.

DUNCAN WOOLEY – (Mid-30s to Early-40s, male) a local minister who is engaged to Meg. He’s not a villain, but he is the character you would probably enjoy spending time with the least. He is not particularly likeable, even though he might be a good man at heart. He is a bit fussy, a bit compulsive and a bit absent-minded.

BUTCH MYERS – (Early -20s to Early-30s, male) A loveable meathead. A former high school football player and current blue collar laborer, he is a bit of a blunt instrument. He’s a bit slow on the uptake, but he is honest, sincere and a generally pleasant person to be around. This role doubles as Frank, a member of the Moose Lodge.

Requirements:

What to bring: • All contact information, personal schedules, and a list of rehearsal conflicts with which to fill out the audition form. • A recent photo if you have one available. Please note, photos will not be returned.

Show Dates: April 14 – May 7, 2017

Location: Omaha Community Playhouse | Hawks Mainstage Theatre | 6915 Cass Street | Omaha, NE 68132

Contact: For more information, contact Jeannine Robertson, jrobertson@omahaplayhouse.com, at (402) 553-4890, ext. 164.